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Seen as thought empty space in a vacuum is not empty is it not possible that the gluon fields that remain affect the trajetory of an electron when carrying out the double slit experiment affecting the outcome.

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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Double slit experiment and quarks $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Dec 11 '14 at 13:48
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    $\begingroup$ This question seems to be the same as your previous, with quarks replaced by gluons. It is really wholly unclear what you are asking - whether because of a language barrier, or because you are confused, I cannot say, but rest assured that an electron has no trajectory to speak of when doing the double slit with it. That's the whole point of the experiment. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Dec 11 '14 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ surely if it hand no trajectory it wouldn't move would it? $\endgroup$ – Daz Hawley Dec 11 '14 at 13:53
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An electron has a macroscopic trajectory from point A to point B, it can be drawn as straight line, if no electric or magnetic fields exist on the way, up to the slit with the indeterminacy of the width encompassing the slits, and from the slits to the point it hits on the screen.

When talking of the vacuum and virtual interactions one is talking of very small dimensions with respect to the slit widths, even for electromagnetic interactions, and even smaller ones for strong interactions that are the domain of gluons and quarks. Gluons manifest at fermi distances in scatterings, whereas the slits are at micron dimensions

If the electron had enough energy to raise interactions with gluons, which are higher order interactions, its wavelength would be so small that it would pass like a particle from one or the other slit with no interferences except, depending on the energy, of creating gluon jets in scattering from the masses off the slit sides.

A real particle, as the electron is, to interact with a virtual particle from the vacuum would have to get energy from somewhere, as energy is conserved and an electron on a trajectory cannot change its energy unless in a very strong real field, as the gravitational field at the horizon of the black holes, which gives rise to Hawking radiation. .

So the answer is no, there is no effect from the virtual vacuum fluctuations in the double slit experiments.

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