1
$\begingroup$

Many years ago people were interested in developing fluidic circuits, i.e. circuits that are analogous to electric ones but that use fluids rather than electricity. It used to be possible to buy fluidic logic gates, amplifiers, and other components, as well as prototyping breadboards. It seems to have gone out of fashion and I can't find them online - does anyone know where I can buy such components now?

(There is some market in the medical supply community for what they call "microfluidics," but these seem generally to be electric-powered valves and pumps and such, not what I'm looking for.)

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I think, we may build these components, since until now, I didn't find a seller that sell the components on the internet. This is the link of a US Patent from google.com/patents google.com/patents/… I found the patents by searching from wikipedia.org/fluidic $\endgroup$ – Lugo Dec 9 '14 at 20:01
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for looking. I've found a number of patents and reference books from the '60's to the '80's, but can't find any current suppliers. $\endgroup$ – pwf Dec 9 '14 at 21:17
  • $\begingroup$ Excellent question, though some may think it is off-topic for physics. If I were you, I would start thinking about 3-d printers. $\endgroup$ – Mike Dunlavey Dec 10 '14 at 22:20
  • $\begingroup$ @Mike Dunlavey - I know, I was looking for a mechanical engineering StackExchange but couldn't find one, so fluid dynamics and electrical circuits topics here seemed like the closest thing. $\endgroup$ – pwf Dec 11 '14 at 7:19
1
$\begingroup$

Pneumatic circuit components are close to what you are looking for. You can buy pneumatic components that allow you to do a wide variety of operations online from places like McMaster-Carr, or directly from the manufacturer, e.g., from Clippard. I'm not so sure there are too many off-the-shelf components that are direct analogues to a particular electrical components, but it appears such things existed at one time.

Either way, components that exist today allow you to do a wide variety of different tasks. I have used these components in a few applications where I wanted some basic logic to be performed to actuate something with a pneumatic cylinder. You can do much more complicated tasks. Clippard has an example on their website of a company that replaced electrical controls with pneumatic circuits for fire safety reasons.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.