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If so, where is the momentum conserved? Any shell may shatter if from a recent land or sea shell. Is a fossil the same way, just waiting for decompression?

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    $\begingroup$ uh... I'm really not sure what this is asking. What does angular momentum have to do with fossils? What's the "log e explanation"? $\endgroup$
    – David Z
    Dec 4 '14 at 7:09
  • $\begingroup$ Rotation of the earth..maybe explains the spiral. $\endgroup$ Dec 4 '14 at 7:11
  • $\begingroup$ Could you please explain your question more? We are not geologist or biologist! What is the equation? $\endgroup$
    – MEDVIS
    Dec 4 '14 at 7:19
  • $\begingroup$ I am asking you to explain the equation to me please, for instance in the Northern hemisphere the rotation of the Earth determines a counter-clockwise spin on matter. Weather, ocean currents all are related in that spin. I wonder if my fossils preserve the original 'spin' of the earth's rotation and have a reserved momentum. $\endgroup$ Dec 4 '14 at 7:45
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The rotation of the Earth causes a force called the Coriolis force. This does have an effect on ocean currents, but the effect is only significant on length scales of hundreds of miles. Over the diameter of a shell, even a big one, the Coriolis force is completely swamped by other effects like tides, local currents, random thermal fluctuations or whether a fish has just swum by.

So the answer is that no, the rotation of the Earth isn't an explanation for log shell growth.

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