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I have a problem with a electrostatics problem: there are two spheres, each one of the same size carrying the same amount of charge, but of different sign. They are connected by a conducting wire, which is later removed. How does it affect their masses and charges?

I think that after connecting the spheres with a wire charges are evenly distributed, so after the wire is removed the spheres should be uncharged. I assume that all of the charges are electrons, so the excess charges should move to the sphere with an electron deficiency. Thus, the mass of the sphere which was positively charged should increase (the mass of the previously negatively charged sphere should decrease). Am I correct?

Thank you,

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I think you are correct with everything you have said. The one thing you haven't mentioned, is how the mass of the spheres compares, before and after their charges are neutralised.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for answering! Well before the wire is connected the spheres are identical (with the exception of the sign of the charge) - the same size and mass. So I think that the mass of the previously positive sphere should increase, while the one of the previously negative charge should decrease. $\endgroup$ – user44502 Dec 2 '14 at 8:14
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Assuming the 2 spheres are perfectly equals in except of charges (same volume and atoms number), after the wire is rempoved , are equal in charge and mass

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