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What will be the image seen to us if an object is placed in between the focus and pole of our eye lens ?

I guess no image will be formed.

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    $\begingroup$ you imagined well $\endgroup$ – Wolphram jonny Nov 23 '14 at 12:07
  • $\begingroup$ but you might see a shadow of the right shape $\endgroup$ – Wolphram jonny Nov 23 '14 at 12:29
  • $\begingroup$ Can you explain what you mean by "pole" ? Just not a term I'm familiar with. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Nov 23 '14 at 13:08
  • $\begingroup$ BTW, remember that the eye is actually a compound optical system, with both the cornea and the lens contributing to image formation. $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Nov 23 '14 at 13:09
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    $\begingroup$ @Simha ah... I should have done my own research. "Pole" is primarily used in medical/anatomical work on the eye. To us engineer types, that's the "surface vertex." $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Nov 23 '14 at 16:28
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What you'll see is a blurred image of the object. Why don't you try keeping a finger too close to your eye and see for yourself ?

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The ray diagram will look somewhat like this : enter image description here

You will not be able to see the image of the object kept inside your eye because none of the rays of light striking that object will reach the retina. There will be a black spot in the image of every object outside the eye because of the shadow of the object inside it. Image of a tree will look somewhat like this:

enter image description here

EDIT

Our eye doesn't have a fixed focus. That being said, if you look at a distant object, our eyes' focal length becomes the distance between our eye's lens and that object. As Simha said, anything that is kept beyond or before the focus will appear blurry. This is more than obvious, and is a daily phenomenon that you would have discovered yourself too, although unknowingly.

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  • $\begingroup$ this is not what i have asked. the object in front of the lens with in the focal length of the lens. You have described the object at the inner focus. $\endgroup$ – Vinayak Nov 24 '14 at 15:46
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    $\begingroup$ Your title reads - "Object inside the eye". What else on earth should I comprehend from that? $\endgroup$ – user49111 Nov 25 '14 at 11:36

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