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Assuming that the universe is spatially infinite, extending outwards in all directions without end, and is consistent with what we have thus far observed, and predict to find (and predict to be out beyond our reach), in the cosmos, then:

Does everything that is physically possible, happen? Just by merit of being physically possible in our universe, does 'it,' happen, somewhere out in the universe?

P.S. Doesn't everything that's possible happen an infinite number of times? The only practical difference being how often something occurs, which would be based upon its likelihood of happening, based upon physical laws.

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    $\begingroup$ I do not understand the question: A fact which never occurs in the Universe (= everything existed, exists, will exist) is impossible by definition. Otherwise I cannot understand what "possible" means. However it has nothing to do with the spatial extension of the Universe. It is more related with pure logic or philosophy... $\endgroup$ – Valter Moretti Oct 31 '14 at 9:59
  • $\begingroup$ Related: physics.stackexchange.com/q/22187/2451 , physics.stackexchange.com/q/22390/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic Oct 31 '14 at 15:01
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I could probably go along with this assertion; except that the observable universe is not infinite. We can only see light reaching us from about 13 billion light years away. The stars/galaxies etc that formed in those distant regions are now even further away from us, but nevertheless, the observable universe is finite.

Expansion of the Universe, will light from some galaxies never reach us?

Size of the universe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observable_universe

Therefore if an event is possible, yet extremely unlikely (the emergence of intelligent life might be an example), it may still be rare within our observable universe, even if common in the universe as a whole.

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The answer would appear to be "yes", assuming every possible state exists at least once. Tegmark did a calculation of the approximate distance between "You" and the next identical instance of "You" in such a universe as 10^10^29 meters away

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  • $\begingroup$ The number you've given is a nice way of saying : This is what you get if you ask such questions. $\endgroup$ – Gaurav Oct 31 '14 at 9:14
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, it's a long walk if you want verification :-) $\endgroup$ – user56903 Oct 31 '14 at 9:53

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