0
$\begingroup$

According to this, our Earth's atmosphere is completely opaque to radiation with wavelengths less than 100 nm as this radiation has enough energy to ionize the air. Since the surface temperature of the Sun is about 6000 °K, it radiates most of it's energy in the visible and infrared regions. But what if the sun was replaced by a star with temperature of 50,000 °K ? According to Wien's displacement law, most of the radiation energy from this new star would be shifted to wavelengths of 60 nm, where the atmosphere is very opaque.

So how would the atmosphere behave for long times under this condition ? Also, would that mean that the temperature of the atmosphere will dramatically rise while the Earth's surface temperature stays low ?

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

A star with a temperature of 50.000 °K would have to be much larger than our sun to sustain that rate of fusion, and our Earth as we know it would not exist. It would have to be much further out and it would be unlikely to form a similar atmosphere. There would probably be more ozone as a direct result of more UV to break stuff, though all emission at UVB might not even let life grow which is the main reason there's a fair amount of oxygen to begin with. Not sure if this is the case for N2 or O2 as they are non-polar molecules and tougher to break.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ And just how is ozone made in the atmosphere to begin with? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Nov 23 '15 at 23:29
  • $\begingroup$ If you know better please correct me and add to the topic, I simply wanted to bring this dead thread to attention. You have a fair point I was simply thinking of how easy ozone is to break, would there be less or more ozone is the question. $\endgroup$ – wololo Nov 25 '15 at 20:05
  • $\begingroup$ The ozone forms because oxygen molecules are dissociated by UV. They are relatively unstable. However, more UV would keep producing more ozone. $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Nov 25 '15 at 20:46
  • $\begingroup$ Okay fair enough, fixed as such. $\endgroup$ – wololo Nov 25 '15 at 21:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.