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Since the cross sectional area is smaller in the middle the water flows faster and experiences a smaller hydrostatic pressure. Additional mass is sucked in from the middle tube and gets accelerated so that the speed of the fluid at the exit should be less than at the entry.

Is the kinetic energy of the fluid at the exit equal to the kinetic energy of the water flow at the entry?

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No, it is not equal.

Without sucking and without friction losses, the kinetic energy would be equal if the inlet and outlet pressures were equal (at equal cross sections). But with sucking, a part of kinetic energy is lost in the inelasic process of mixing of two masses. It is like in a usual classical mechanics: if one body hits another one and sticks to it, there is a loss of kinetic energy (inelastic loss).

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