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I know that voltmeters are commonly in parallel and ammeters are commonly in series. I believe that the voltmeters in diagrams 2 are actually in series. How am I wrong?

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In Diagram 4, I don't understand how the voltmeter is connected in parallel. I don't see how the Ammeter is connected in Series. Can you explain how the connection of the voltmeters are in parallel? Usually, when I see a parallel connection, I see multiple resistors as seen in diagram 1. I doubt that the Voltmeters in figure 2 and 3 are in parallel.

How is the ammeter in diagram one in series? I know that series is defined as "there is only one path for the electrons to take between any two points in this circuit." But the electrons can either take the path through the resistor or through the ammeter. More likely, they'll go through the path of the ammeter.

Why do voltmeters have high resistance? How can "high resistance affect as little as possible the current that flows in the actual circuit when in parallel with it"? Why is it that " If the voltmeter wasn't connected in parallel it couldn't measure the potential across a particular circuit or circuit component - which is the purpose of a voltmeter."? How can keeping a voltmeter in parallel reduce the effect of the resistance on the circuit? Can you mathematically explain the quotations that I wrote?

What would happen if a voltmeter were wired in series?

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  • $\begingroup$ Lots of questions! For the last, since you already state that voltmeters have a high resistance, how would that affect the circuit? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Oct 18 '14 at 16:40
  • $\begingroup$ in a series circuit, the electrons might not want to pass through the voltmeter, but I think if many electrons build up at the negative terminal, they'll have to go through the voltmeter anyway, but voltmeters would not be as effective in series as in parallel. $\endgroup$ – user57712 Oct 18 '14 at 16:46
  • $\begingroup$ @JonCuster It may not be clear what i'm asking, in summary(let me condense all those questions), I don't see how (in the diagrams) especially in figure 2, that the volt meter is actually parallel and not series. $\endgroup$ – user57712 Oct 18 '14 at 16:49
  • $\begingroup$ There is only one diagram where the ammeter is in series and the voltmeter in parallel. Which figure is it? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Oct 18 '14 at 16:54
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    $\begingroup$ What makes you unsure? What is you thinking? What current do you want to measure? $\endgroup$ – Jon Custer Oct 18 '14 at 17:02
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In Diagram 4, I don't understand how the voltmeter is connected in parallel.

Parallel vs. Series - needs a reference. Either Producer (Source of electricity) or consumer (the Resistor in your diagrams).
Diagram 4: Vmeter is in Parallel with the Resistor because the current is split. The Ameter is in Series with the Resistor (and Vmeter, but you can safely ignore that since the Vmeter has high impedance so negligible current will go that way) - same current goes through Ameter and R, not split, so they are in Series. This is the correct diagram for measuring the current that goes through the R and the Voltage at its terminals.

I don't see how the Ammeter is connected in Series.

Answered above.

Can you explain how the connection of the voltmeters are in parallel?

Answerd.

Usually, when I see a parallel connection, I see multiple resistors as seen in diagram 1.

It's not multiple resistors, but this diagram makes no sense, it is parallel though.

I doubt that the Voltmeters in figure 2 and 3 are in parallel.

Again, you need a reference. "in parallel" with what?

How is the ammeter in diagram one in series?

It's not.

I know that series is defined as "there is only one path for the electrons to take between any two points in this circuit."

This is correct, but it makes no sense to discuss it on diagram 1, because the Ameter there is connected in parallel with R.

Why do voltmeters have high resistance?

Because you want to use it in parallel with the device you want to measure the voltage at its terminals and the principle is that you want to be as non-invasive as possible.

How can "high resistance affect as little as possible the current that flows in the actual circuit when in parallel with it"? Why is it that " If the voltmeter wasn't connected in parallel it couldn't measure the potential across a particular circuit or circuit component - which is the purpose of a voltmeter."? How can keeping a voltmeter in parallel reduce the effect of the resistance on the circuit? Can you mathematically explain the quotations that I wrote? What would happen if a voltmeter were wired in series?

This sounds more and more as a homework, so I'll let you get on with it. I'm sure you can do it now :-)

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