2
$\begingroup$

One way to make a linearly polarized beam rotating at frequency $\Delta f\approx10\mbox{MHz}$ is by combining two circularly polarized beams, one left-handed and one right-handed, and where one beam is at a frequency $f$ and the other at $f\pm\Delta f$. Is there another way to do this using only a single beam passed through some active optical device (eg electro-optic-modulator)? I'm interested in the mid-infrared (10.6um).

$\endgroup$
2
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Just put a polarizing filter there and rotate it with an electric motor, if you don't need very high rotation frequency that would do what you want. $\endgroup$ – Maxim Umansky Oct 14 '14 at 16:59
  • $\begingroup$ Unfortunately I would need frequency of about 10MHz. I'll edit the question. $\endgroup$ – cpc333 Oct 14 '14 at 18:10
1
$\begingroup$

A Pockel cell followed by a quarter waveplate will do this. The Pockel cell acts as an electrically controlled waveplate which will give an elliptical state. The waveplate will then convert this to a rotated linear state. Producing a 10MHz driving signal at the several kilovolts required might be a challenge but not impossible.

$\endgroup$
0
0
$\begingroup$

Faraday Effect. The plane of polarization in a medium is rotated when exposed to a magnetic field. Solenoid, glass rod.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.