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Do they differ in just frequency and wavelenght ? Or there is more about it

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    $\begingroup$ Fundamentally, yes. The difference in frequency and wavelength causes a difference in colour, too. $\endgroup$ – Gaurav Oct 1 '14 at 11:49
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    $\begingroup$ "A rose by any other name..." The history of naming different parts of the EM spectrum is full of odd stuff :-). BTW, @PhysicistByLogic please identify the "color" of X-rays! $\endgroup$ – Carl Witthoft Oct 1 '14 at 11:58
  • $\begingroup$ LOL! My bad. Should've mentioned that that was the case for visible spectra. $\endgroup$ – Gaurav Oct 1 '14 at 12:34
  • $\begingroup$ The frequency & Planck's constant makes it a difference in energy ($E=h\nu$). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Oct 1 '14 at 12:53
  • $\begingroup$ Yes as metnioned the difference is in wavelength (or equivalently frequency) an as a result of Einstein/Planck fromula ($E=hv$) energy as well $\endgroup$ – Nikos M. Oct 1 '14 at 13:11
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They have various properties that differ, but the differences are quantitative, not qualitative, and there is no sharp boundary. The differences occur because of the difference in frequency. A wave that is a gamma ray in one frame of reference could be an x-ray if observed in a different frame.

An example of their different properties is that gamma rays are more penetrating, and are more likely to undergo Compton scattering rather than the photoelectric effect. The reason x rays and gammas were given different names is that originally nobody knew they were both part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The name "gamma" was simply a label used to classify them by how penetrating they were -- more penetrating than alphas or betas.

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Short answer: yes, they are both electromagnetic waves and differ only in frequency.

Slightly longer answer: of course they also differ in all other properties that are a function of frequency: wavelength, energy, momentum.

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