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I have 8L of frying oil (canola) - if I put it in a metal canister after frying and put that canister in ice water, what is the minimum amount of ice water that I need to bring the oil to a temperature of 25C from 190C *in 10min. I vaguely remember this as a problem in thermo but does anyone have the set up?

Ok, so I looked at the newton's law of cooling and it's pretty simple. A friendly pointer to that would have sufficed.

Cheers.

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  • $\begingroup$ Is "ice water" ice or water? More specifically what's its temperature? $\endgroup$
    – DarioP
    Sep 16 '14 at 11:44
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    $\begingroup$ In addition to this question being off-topic as it presents a homework question with no attempts, it also lacks the required information to provide a precise answer. What is the temperature of the ice water? How much insulation does the metal canister provide? $\endgroup$
    – JamalS
    Sep 16 '14 at 11:57
  • $\begingroup$ ...also, isn't it a terrible idea to use water to cool hot oil?! $\endgroup$
    – Danu
    Sep 16 '14 at 12:24
  • $\begingroup$ This is not a homework question - it represents a real world problem for a vendor. Also if you read - the oil is in a metal canister that is then lowered into cold water. This is a genuine problem for a business that uses a fryer vending in a market. If you want to know specifically, the market is smorgasburg in Brooklyn NY. www.smorgasburg.com $\endgroup$
    – jc303
    Sep 16 '14 at 13:54
  • $\begingroup$ Hi jcooper. Welcome to Phys.SE. If you haven't already done so, please take a minute to read the definition of when to use the homework tag, and the Phys.SE policy for homework-like problems. $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Sep 16 '14 at 14:30

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