0
$\begingroup$

enter image description here

Why isn't $V= V_1 + V_2$? $V=V_a - V_c = V_a - V_b + V_b - V_c$, $V_a - V_b= V_1$ and $V_b - V_c = V_2$ Doesn't that prove that $V = V_1 + V_2$?

Regardless of $V_3$,

If i'm wrong , is there a way to obtain $V$ in terms of $V_1$, $V_2$ and $V_3$

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ According to your diagram $V$ should be zero, since $V_A=V_C$. $\endgroup$ – fibonatic Sep 13 '14 at 21:10
  • $\begingroup$ how?if you're talking about the middle one on the left not connected it was a misstype i'm sorry $\endgroup$ – user31731 Sep 13 '14 at 21:14
  • $\begingroup$ The three devices all have the same voltage across since they are parallel connected. Note that points A and C are the same circuit node and all three devices connect to that node. Further, all three devices connect to node B. Thus, there are only two nodes in this circuit and just one actual voltage which is the voltage across the parallel connected devices. $\endgroup$ – Alfred Centauri Sep 13 '14 at 22:03
1
$\begingroup$

Actually V=0!

Notice that the left branch shorted the right one, because the points A & C are the same, thus Va = Vc.

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Note that your circuit is equivalent to this:

enter image description here

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.