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Can the term shadow pertain to anything else than light? Feel free to interpret this question in the widest sense possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ The link Qmechanic added answers your question. I do not see a question about physics here. $\endgroup$ – ACuriousMind Sep 7 '14 at 16:35
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    $\begingroup$ This question appears to be off-topic because it is about the usage of an english word. It might be better posed on EL&U.SE $\endgroup$ – Jim Sep 7 '14 at 16:35
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Yes! Any beam that is blocked by an object will basically make a shadow. For example, the IceCube detector can see the moon's cosmic ray shadow.

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    $\begingroup$ Exellent, I wish I'd thought of that one! $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Sep 7 '14 at 16:12
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For example, acoustic shadow (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acoustic_shadow ).

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Yes, for example a Crookes tube shows an electron shadow. The area I live (Chester, UK) is in a rain shadow.

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Yes, the term "shadow" can refer also to something or (dare I say) someone that is dark, shady, inconspicuous, etc. One can also use it as a verb; to shadow someone is to follow them closely. Like "I'm having the new guy shadow me for a while until he learns how to do everything".

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    $\begingroup$ I was hesitant to use this definition at first, but the question says "feel free to interpret this question in the widest sense possible". I think I've succeeded at that $\endgroup$ – Jim Sep 7 '14 at 16:37

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