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A chemist who dumped liquid nitrogen on his head described the act as very dangerous; yet, at the same time, he mentioned that the Leidenfrost effect would protect him from the dangers of this act.

Clearly, one can see from the video that nothing particularly dangerous happened to him.

I'm therefore confused: why is this act dangerous, then, when the Leidenfrost effect clearly protects you?

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    $\begingroup$ AHHHHHHH!!!! Don't do that. Leidenfrost protects you from a drop of LN2. That was incredibly risky and utterly irresponsible to demonstrate as part of a viral trend. $\endgroup$ – user10851 Sep 7 '14 at 2:11
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    $\begingroup$ Ah, another video of an idiot has surfaced on the internet. What's that got to do with physics, though... unless you want us to calculate the probability for you, that some fool who will repeat this nonsense will get injured? That probability is 100%. $\endgroup$ – CuriousOne Sep 7 '14 at 2:30
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It's dangerous because if you pour too much liquid nitrogen, or too fast, then your skin will freeze and you end up with a terrible headache (or death).

See Wikipedia for what the Leidenfrost effect is.

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It's dangerous because the Leidenfrost effect is only temporary; it only works as long as the temperature of the skin exposed to liquid nitrogen is much higher than the boiling point of liquid nitrogen. Obviously, even if an "insulating" layer of gas is formed, there will still be a strong cooling effect whenever liquid nitrogen is involved. The "safe" amount of time to be in contact with liquid nitrogen can only be determined by observing a series of idiots who each try to outdo each others' stunts until one of them gets badly injured.

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