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You see the poles of a magnet on every magnet picture, and they are said to be in the direction of magnetic field lines, but what does that mean? Is the number of electrons different on one side of the magnet? If electrons only repel each other how do they act like magnets?

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closed as off-topic by user36790, ACuriousMind, Sebastian Riese, hft, HDE 226868 Sep 20 '15 at 18:44

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    $\begingroup$ See wikipedia $\endgroup$ – Jim Aug 30 '14 at 19:26
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    $\begingroup$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because this shows lack of research-effort. This type of questions can be easily solved by quick googling. $\endgroup$ – user36790 Sep 20 '15 at 9:00
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The simplest operation definition is that the "poles" are regions where the magnetic field strength at the surface is relatively high.


Generally magnets do not have significant differences in charge density from pole to pole (though that can not be ruled out in special case), so no, there is no expectation of more or less electrons near the poles.

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Look at it like this,

The poles of a magnet are the regions where the magnetic field lines enter or leave the interior of the magnet. The pole where the field lines enter the magnet is called the south pole and the pole where the field lines exit the magnet is called the north pole.

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