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If the molecules/atoms of a solid object vibrate quickly enough, would the way a human eye perceives that object be changed? Would the object appear to "flicker" or have almost a transparent look to it? I know with a tuning fork there is a change but I am thinking of a faster vibration.

Also, would this type of vibration cause any negative effects to the object? What if the object was living? If you took an animals (No, I am not experimenting on any) and somehow caused the molecules in it's body to vibrate at an extremely high rate, assuming it didn't die for one reason or another, would the vibrations cause increased aging or some other noticeable effect(s)?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think your question is quite broad as it stand. What kind of amplitudes are you referring to? Small scale vibration are related to temperature, or do you mean coherent or larger scale vibrations? Maybe it is better to clarify this a bit in the first paragraph, and keep the second one for a different question later on. $\endgroup$ – Bernhard Aug 23 '14 at 7:39
  • $\begingroup$ Bernhard, I apologize if I am not very "scientifically" minded, but I often wonder about how/why things operate, etc. I'm not sure what "type" of vibration. I was thinking more about vibrations be at the lowest level of the object, at the core. Could the vibrations ever reach a speed that would cause the object to change in appearance or possibly even shape? I'm not sure if I am making any sense...it makes sense to me, but it might be confusing for everyone else. But I believe that Mr. Rennie has given me enough information to satisfy my curiosity on the subject. Thank you both for replying. $\endgroup$ – Neil Aug 23 '14 at 12:14
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Much of what you ask is covered in the question Demonstration that vibrating basic particles constitute non-vibrating individuals. The vibration is imperceptible to the eye so the object wouldn't look different.

However you ask:

Also, would this type of vibration cause any negative effects to the object?

Yes, indeed it would. The vibration you describe is what we mean by temperature. If you increase the vibration you are increasing the temperature. Do this very much and you would cook the object - for living objects I think it's fair to describe this as a negative effect (unless the living object is your lunch of course, though it still seems harsh to cook it alive).

From your last question:

would the vibrations cause increased aging or some other noticeable effect(s)?

I'm guessing you were hoping for some esoteric effect, but I'm afraid vibration is just heat. The only effects would come from being heated up, so this wouldn't cause rapid aging or anything else out of a science fiction novel.

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