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For example if a body in motion experiences time dilation, why does it see a body at rest slow down relative to it? wouldn't it make more sense if the body at rest has a faster clock relative to it?

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  • $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of Question about Time Dilation $\endgroup$ Aug 18, 2014 at 10:46
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    $\begingroup$ Ray, I've linked a question that seems a close duplicate. There are loads of such questions on the site because the question get's asked so often. If you search the site for time dilation is:question you'll find lots of related stuff. $\endgroup$ Aug 18, 2014 at 10:48
  • $\begingroup$ One way to know that clocks slow down relative to each other is to look at the line spectra of atoms. Actually, this is behind the operation of GPS. $\endgroup$
    – hyd
    Aug 19, 2014 at 6:11

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"How do we know that clocks slow down relative to each other?"

Experimentally. This has been observed many times in the lab. The same answer is true for ANYTHING in physics and science in general. We only know that it is true, because we have experimental evidence for it.

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No, since by the principle of relativity: A body in constant velocity motion cannot determine whether it is in motion in a certain direction or whether everything else is in motion in the other direction. No physical experiment can determine this hence for all purposes a body in motion will simply claim that it is at rest while the other body is in motion.

Hence from Special Relativity, it will measure the other bodies clocks(which are in motion) as ticking at a slower rate.

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