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For my question assume:

1: Big bang happened at a point (I know it happened everywhere) but after that explosion universe started to expand in all directions so it maybe considered to happened somewhere. (my imagination: water balloon popped with a pin and it start splattering away water in all directions and water continue to move forever)

2: Light bends around huge planets (relativity theory).

Question: when we look at the stars using telescopes, how we can determine if the light is bent due to nearby planets ( we can but only for the planets which we can see) but how about those planets which cant even see ? on the basis of this, is there a possibility that everything/majority of what we see in the sky is actually coming from just 1 direction but we see it everywhere because that incoming ray of light bent so much that w.r.t to earth, it looks like coming from different directions ?

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    $\begingroup$ Your impression of the Big Bang has problems. There is no point at which it occurred. Really. Seriously. But I don't see what that has to do with your main question anyway. $\endgroup$ – user10851 Jun 28 '14 at 1:34
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A dense object like a planet, star, or black hole would blur the image of the universe. what we see, instead, is a very smooth and homogenous image. I guess this would still leave open the prospect of some sort of diffuse object of sufficient mass to bend all the light coming into us, but there are reasons to believe that no object with a mass this large would be able to be stably stay formed.

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First:

Two different concepts of point and direction are used in the question. One concept is "point of big bang" and "direction of (wrt) bing bang", second is "point of observer" and "direction of (wrt) observer". The (assumed) initial nig bang point is (wrt to the observer) not a point now, it is a whole volume/surface, so a volume/surface has many points.

Second:

Indeed there are percentages of space where what is observed comes mostly from one(?) distant point (or area). This is called gravitatioonal lensing

Thirdly:

If i understand correct this is a similar question to whether the universe is (or is inside) a black hole? Since black holes have event horizon, everywhere one would look it would eventually be the same place/point.

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