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I started a little bit of Googling around the topic, and found very few information. There are mainly upper limits. I found lower limits only to the rest mass differences of the different neutrino flavors.

Thus, what are the actually current known lower mass limits to the neutrino flavors?

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't have a reference handy, but I believe you have correctly stated the situation. We know that there are three different neutrino mass states, but we don't know whether the lightest neutrino is massive or massless. $\endgroup$ – rob Jun 17 '14 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ @rob Thank you. If it is so, then we have a lower limit at least for the second lightest neutrino? $\endgroup$ – user259412 Jun 17 '14 at 18:04
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    $\begingroup$ The differences of the square masses are known (to within a sign in one case). From that you can determine the lower bound on the heaviest mass state, and (modulo knowing the hierarchy) you can place a lower bound on the middle mass state. Beyond that you're stuck. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Jun 17 '14 at 19:10
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The lower mass limits of neutrinos is not 0eV. They have to have a mass, since we can observe neutrino oscillations. This is something the standard model did not get right. Looking at PDG (2014) the boundaries seem to be 0 < m < 2ev.

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The three masses of the neutrinos are: .04ev/cc, .08 and .12. These are not limits, up or down, these are the masses. It should be noted that the differences are the mass states.

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  • $\begingroup$ From where do you know it? $\endgroup$ – user259412 Apr 13 '17 at 12:32
  • $\begingroup$ I am sorry, but I don't know any experimental result about this. There is an ongoing, \$60million experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany (KATRIN), which will measure the mass of the anti-electron neutrino, if it is over $\approx$ 0.13eV. $\endgroup$ – user259412 Apr 13 '17 at 18:52
  • $\begingroup$ These values don't even respect the known $\Delta (m^2)$s. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Apr 13 '17 at 19:35

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