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We send email in order to transfer information and, over time, the technology used to send email improves to send email at faster rate.

Since we use the Internet to send information from one place to another place all over the world, can information speed be faster than light speed via the Internet?

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    $\begingroup$ Plain simple, No. $\endgroup$ Jun 9, 2014 at 8:48
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    $\begingroup$ obviously NO $\endgroup$
    – Freddy
    Jun 9, 2014 at 8:51
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    $\begingroup$ In my opinion, this question does not deserve this many downvotes. That most of us can easily answer it, does not mean we should downvote... $\endgroup$
    – Bernhard
    Jun 9, 2014 at 10:43
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    $\begingroup$ @user3194189 To travel to the other side of the world, would take $0.07s$, maybe it helps you to put the speed of e-mails in perspective. $\endgroup$
    – Bernhard
    Jun 9, 2014 at 10:47
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    $\begingroup$ @RijulGupta in a way, that is exactly one of the reasons one should downvote a question: when it would have been easy for the OP to answer, and they haven't done so. $\endgroup$
    – David Z
    Jun 9, 2014 at 17:49

3 Answers 3

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The internet is a collection of physical machines connected by copper-polyethylene signal wires, which carry signals at $0.7c$–$0.8c$, optical fibers, which carry signals at $0.6c$–$0.7c$, and occasionally radio links, which propagate in air at approximately $c$. Ironically, radio links are generally the slowest way to send long messages, because of the way that bandwidth (in both senses of the word) is allocated. There are also delays introduced when an intermediate machine receives and re-routes a message between two computers.

Internet speed is faster than a lot of things,

but it's not faster than light.

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I knew the answer.That thought arose in my mind whether internet speed can be faster than speed of light, so i had asked the question.

Within one click your information could reach from one place from another.If a person sends an information from a place 'A' which is far away i.e 300000km from another place 'B', even then information might reach within 1 second.So speed is same as speed of light. So this thought made me to ask such question.

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  • $\begingroup$ In point of fact, the speed of the internet is mostly that of optical fiber and coax or twisted pair copper, which is to say about $(2/3)c$. That said, we use a questions and answer format here and "answers" should be reserved for answering the question, not used to explain why you asked it. This has been flagged as "not an answer" and a candidate for deletion. I'm not going to delete it, because you sort of provide an answer, but it is a close thing and I think that right now this is a rather poor answer. $\endgroup$ Jun 15, 2014 at 1:15
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No, the internet you have is conveyed via radiation, of which the speed is equal to the speed of light, or through wires by moving electrons, whose drift velocity is less than the speed of light. (This is obvious since electrons have mass. According to special relativity mass tends to infinity at light speed. Hence no amount of force can cause acceleration to overcome $v=c$.)

Unless you figure out how to use tachyons for communication. But that is also not possible I suppose, as tachyons don't interact with ordinary matter. And as a direct result, no observation of them is possible, as far as i know.

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    $\begingroup$ Please consider using the normal rules of English writing to make your answer easier to read. $\endgroup$
    – The Photon
    Jun 9, 2014 at 18:42
  • $\begingroup$ I don't think your answer is wrong, but it's hard to tell because it's difficult to understand. That's probably why you're getting downvotes; answers are often downvoted if they are unclear, whether or not they are technically correct. $\endgroup$
    – David Z
    Jun 9, 2014 at 20:32
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    $\begingroup$ @Mvs_Physics Just edit your answer and make it simple with proper English, after that you might get some up votes. $\endgroup$
    – Freddy
    Jun 13, 2014 at 9:41
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    $\begingroup$ I believe you should mention propagation speed or something like that rather than drift speed, right? The electron drift velocity is only a few millimeters per second. $\endgroup$
    – Steeven
    May 22, 2015 at 23:53
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    $\begingroup$ "drift velocity [..] this is obvious since electrons have mass" - the drift velocity is certainly below the speed of light (in fact it's on the order of meters/hour), but that's irrelevant because it's not the electrons themselves carrying the information, but the electric field $\endgroup$ May 26, 2017 at 19:01

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