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I want to experiment it in my house or office. I think it would be of great fun to see the transition in real life.

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Gadolinium (Curie temperature - 292K (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curie_temperature)), price: about 100 USD for 10g (http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/materials-science/material-science-products.html?TablePage=19297763 ), about 17 USD for 1.5 g at ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/GADOLINIUM-METAL-99-95-1-5g-in-ampoule-under-argon-/120173806351 ). Please research safety issues thoroughly (http://www.sigmaaldrich.com/catalog/product/aldrich/263087?lang=en&region=US)

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  • $\begingroup$ so it seems that such material is not so common, unlike iron. It is still not so cheap or so easy to obtain. It is still far away from everyday life. $\endgroup$ – Jiang-min Zhang May 31 '14 at 19:58
  • $\begingroup$ @PKSer: Well, only you can decide if it suits your purpose. MnAs may be of interest as well (315K Curie point), but it is not cheap either. $\endgroup$ – akhmeteli May 31 '14 at 20:43
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Gadolinium is one candidate, and its $T_c$ is about 292 K.

Ref: Nigh, H. E., Legvold, S., & Spedding, F. H. (1963). Magnetization and electrical resistivity of gadolinium single crystals. Physical Review, 132(3), 1092.

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  • $\begingroup$ Gadolinium has come down in price by about a factor of 100 since the Chinese started large scale rare-earth extraction. $\endgroup$ – dmckee May 31 '14 at 15:46

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