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I'm a master student working on networks analysis in general. A network is something that has nodes and there are links between the nodes. Nodes and links could have attributes. An evolving network is one that changes overtime (new nodes and links are added..etc). An example of that is Facebook. Nodes are users and links represent the friendship relationship. Users have attributes (gender, age ..etc). A Facebook network as you know is an example of a social network.

The issue is that so many people studied traditional evolving networks like social networks, the web, or transportation networks. Currently I'm looking for novel examples of evolving networks to study them. So I thought there might be some examples in physics that could represent some kind of an evolving network.

So my question: Can you give me examples in physics for evolving networks? I dunno, maybe collisions of particles of so ... etc.

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closed as too broad by John Rennie, Brandon Enright, Kyle Kanos, Kyle Oman, JamalS May 28 '14 at 6:42

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This seems to be a "big list" type question which is generally not well-received here on Physics.StackExchange. You might be able to re-write this question to be a bit more specific, but it could turn into a duplicate of this question (which has a well-researched answer). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos May 27 '14 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ Easy! Quantum Graphity models are evolving graphs <arxiv.org/abs/hep-th/0611197> $\endgroup$ – N. Steinle Aug 2 '18 at 14:06
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Not necessarily Physics per se, (technically Bio-Physics) - but one example involves protein-protein interaction in the formation of protein interaction networks.

Since this topic is related to Genetic networks, it's worth linking that page here too - which gives an overview from a more rigorous Mathematical standpoint and using standard Graph Theory nomenclature and jargon:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_networks#Modelling

Since the above utilizes considerations of energetics, surface area, geometry and other physical properties - in its most abstract form this concept and formalism can be applied to any stochastic system of interacting particles.

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