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I was studying on Gravitation the PPN formalism.

Since in equation (39.41) pag. 1087, the term

$1 + \dfrac{v^2}{2}+(2+\gamma)U = 1 + \dfrac{v^2}{2}+3U$ (the second in GR)

looked odd, I tried (several times) to derive the formula, but I always find:

$1 + \dfrac{v^2}{2}+U$

Is this one of the two famous errors metioned by Wheeler?

I am really going crazy over this...

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    $\begingroup$ Just two errors? I find that unlikely. $\endgroup$
    – user10851
    May 20 '14 at 16:03
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    $\begingroup$ Just two famous ones... $\endgroup$
    – Kyle Oman
    May 20 '14 at 19:52
  • $\begingroup$ Is the question really to know if this is specifically one of two mentioned by Wheeler, or just if this is an error? $\endgroup$
    – Brick
    Oct 12 '15 at 5:35
  • $\begingroup$ @Brick just to know if it is an error. $\endgroup$
    – mattiav27
    Oct 12 '15 at 7:09
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    $\begingroup$ In the edition that I have, I have the equation $A^0{}_0 = 1 + \frac{v^2}{2} + U + {\cal O} (\epsilon^4)$. Is this the one that you are looking for? $\endgroup$
    – Prahar
    Oct 13 '15 at 4:27
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Equation 39.41 is quite different in my edition:

$$ A^0_0 = 1 + \frac{v^2}{2} + U + O(\epsilon^4) $$

This is from the hardcover edition published 12/31/1973 (ISBN 0-7167-0334-3). Prior to this the paperback version was published 9/15/1973 (ISBN 0-7167-0334-1).

If your edition has an ISBN number ending in 1 or 2, then this is the revised and correct equation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes you are right: I have the second edition. $\endgroup$
    – mattiav27
    Oct 17 '15 at 8:45

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