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After some discussions with my friend about some "popular" aspects of quantum mechanics, my friend asked me whether there exist any books that could convey the basic ideas in a non-technical way (my friend is not in any technical field). I am in mathematics, so I'm not aware of any such texts in physics. Your suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks!

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This answer contains some additional resources that may be useful. Please note that answers which simply list resources but provide no details are strongly discouraged by the site's policy on resource recommendation questions. This answer is left here to contain additional links that do not yet have commentary.

Posted by stupidity, here:

  • Taking the Quantum Leap: The New Physics for Nonscientists by Fred A. Wolf.

  • Quantum Theory: A Very Short Introduction by John Polkinghorne.

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There are a couple of books that explain quantum mechanics fairly well with no technical prerequisites. "The Fabric of Reality" by David Deutsch explains a lot about quantum mechanics. See especially chapters 2,9 and 11. "The Beginning of Infinity" by David Deutsch, chapter 11 and 12.

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Without question you need to read MacSchrödinger's Cat by the somewhat cryptically name Reed dé Buch.

Cover Macschrödingers-Cat

It wasn't until I found this bizarre book that I finally understood how it was possible to understand modern physics without equations.

It doesn't treat the reader like an idiot, yet at the same time it's filled with idiocy. You could also look at the author's blog http://reeddebuch.blogspot.com/ but he hasn't written much this year.

Although, how the author turned Erwin Schrödinger into a deranged hebephrenic Scotsman beats me.

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