3
$\begingroup$

First of all, you may say that, this is a "why" question and in physics we don't ask such a question and instead we ask about "how". However, I want to discuss this with you.

We model the behavior of matter by physical laws, for example by quantum mechanics laws. I want to know how the matter, say electron, knows that it must obey such a law. What forces the electron to obey quantum mechanics laws?

If you consider a simulation of the universe in a computer, in the view of someone simulated in that computer the physical laws are just there. They may not know what keeps in check the simulated matter to obey physical laws, but in our perspective those simulated physical laws are there because we implemented them as zero and ones in a hard disk. If we wanted, we could change those physical laws and in the eye of the simulated person everything would be still fine.

Is there a scientific attempt to discuss this issue? so that I can read about it.

$\endgroup$

closed as primarily opinion-based by Kyle Kanos, Brandon Enright, jinawee, Jim, BMS May 2 '14 at 16:18

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 2
    $\begingroup$ Matter does not direct itself according to what we accept as our physical laws. These laws are just formulations of how things are expected to behave in the world based on past observations and their analysis. $\endgroup$ – Ján Lalinský May 1 '14 at 13:56
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ It's rather the other way round. Physical laws seem to be the consequence of the properties of matter. $\endgroup$ – bright magus May 1 '14 at 14:00
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This question might find a more interested audience on philosophy.SE. $\endgroup$ – Chris Mueller May 1 '14 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ Possible duplicates: physics.stackexchange.com/q/759/2451 , physics.stackexchange.com/q/47511/2451 and links therein. $\endgroup$ – Qmechanic May 1 '14 at 14:45
6
$\begingroup$

As several of the comments suggest I think you are misunderstanding the nature of a physical law is. Physical laws do not control how particles etc. behave but are just our best estimate of what is happening. The laws can change as we get more knowledge, the actual behavior doesn't.

For example when Einstein "discovered" relativity particles didn't stop following Newton's law and start following relativity.

As to why these laws and constants are what they are, the simple answer is - if they where different then the universe would not behave as it does. There is some discussion on this but I think it is mostly philosophical in nature.

More interesting is the question of whether these constants are necessarily constant across the universe/time. For example this.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I mean how two separate particles obey the same physical law. Physical laws are our model to describe the universe, but how every single bit of matter respect this model? Why don't they behave in different ways? What forces them to obey this model or laws? $\endgroup$ – MOON May 2 '14 at 10:15
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Two seperate particles behave different all the time! The charge of an electron is different from the charge of the proton, so is its mass and many other quantities. Many things are different between two particles. However, from previous observations we have seen that some things are the same: For example, if their speed is small they will both behave the way quantum mechanics describes.These commonalities with think of them as "the laws of nature", until finding a particle that behaves differently. So: particles do what particles do.It is our brain that organizes the similarities into "laws". $\endgroup$ – Heterotic May 2 '14 at 12:57

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.