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I was recently introduced to dimensional analysis and I wanted good references for learning the ideas behind it and representation of the natural world. I'm a grad student in biology. I don't have much of a physics background.

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  • $\begingroup$ Dimensional analysis is applicable to every field, not just biology or physics. Probably the best reference is to search the web for 1st year courses that deal with a lot of math. In the first couple of weeks of the course, the concept will have been explained. $\endgroup$ – LDC3 Apr 19 '14 at 21:41
  • $\begingroup$ I don't normally recommend it, but this is one of the rare circumstances when wikipedia has a great article on the subject... $\endgroup$ – Alex Nelson Apr 20 '14 at 4:34
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This is a great summary of dimensional analysis written by Ain Sonin, a former professor of mechanical engineering at MIT. It's only ~50 pages, and most of it should be accessible to you. Though some examples may draw on parts of physics you're not familiar with, it is very well-written and should clarify the subject greatly.

http://web.mit.edu/2.25/www/pdf/DA_unified.pdf

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A very good book, with more than 200 worked-out examples, is 'Applied Dimensional Analysis and Modeling' by Thomas Szirtes, MacGraw Hill, ISBN 0-07-062811-4

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