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When I was riding a car (I was not the driver), my eardrum felt a little similar to the case when I was in a plane that was taking off, and little loss of hearing. Nothing was played inside. The feeling was gone, when I left the car. This don't happen often when I ride a car. So I wonder what might be the reason? Thanks!

That happened when the car was moving on a plain. at normal speed on a road in a city in NY. The weather was normal. I didn't sneeze. Perhaps swallowing helped a little. Windows were closed probably.

Is this not good to health?

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  • $\begingroup$ It's probably a pressure-related thing. I've had it happen occasionally too. I'm not sure if it's caused by altitude changes (up/down a hill) or by aerodynamic effects while driving, but it's common to happen when elevation changes are involved. $\endgroup$ – DumpsterDoofus Apr 15 '14 at 19:25
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    $\begingroup$ Any answers here can only be wild guesses, because there isn't enough information to go on. Did this only happen while the car was moving? How fast? What was the terrain? The weather? Were you driving through a tornado? Did you sneeze particularly hard? Did the feeling go away upon swallowing? Were any windows open? $\endgroup$ – user10851 Apr 15 '14 at 19:45
  • $\begingroup$ @ChrisWhite: when the car was moving on a plain. at normal speed on a road in a city in NY. The weather was normal. I didn't sneeze. Perhaps swallowing helped a little. Windows were closed probably. $\endgroup$ – Tim Apr 15 '14 at 19:47
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Sudden change in athmosferic pressure due to several reasons.

You can reproduce that effect by opening the roof hatch or rear seat side window wile driving. Though, I am not capable to describe all the fluid dynamics going on there. I am guessing that due to aerodynamical features of the car, there's lowered air pressure near rear windows or behind roof hatc.

Many smartphones have a built-in barometeric sensor. If you have one, you could run a little test next time and see what happens when you open window or close ventilation holes, drive uphill etc.

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Were you in a mountainous area? You can have that feeling due to change in elevation. Atmospheric pressure changes with elevation.

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