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Assume you are moving 10 meters in 10 seconds northward. What is the acceleration?.

Using this equation: $a = (v_f - v_o)/\Delta(t)$ and filling it in with this data: $v_f=1$ which comes from $10$ $m/10s=1m/s$, $v_o=0$ because we are starting at a speed of $0$ and $t=10$ because that's how long it tooks. We find out that $a = (1-0)/(10)$ which equals $.1$ $m/s$ $N$.

But when you use a different equation: $a=2d/t^2$ and filling in $d$ with $10m$, and $t$ with $10s$ you get $a=20/100^2$ which is $.2m/s/s$) Why is this?

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Assume you are moving 10 meters in 10 seconds northward. What is the acceleration?.

You cannot determine acceleration from this information. This information could represent a constant velocity of 1 meter/second and zero acceleration.

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  • $\begingroup$ I must not be remembering it right, because that's what my teacher asked me. I also understand what you are saying, it makes sense. You could be moving at said velocity and not accelerating. $\endgroup$ – user16795 Apr 7 '14 at 23:32
  • $\begingroup$ yes, you would need more information to find acceleration. You only have enough information to find average velocity. You wouldn't need a statement like acceleration is constant (which isn't general true), plus additional information like initial and final velocity, or initial velocity and distance. $\endgroup$ – DavePhD Apr 7 '14 at 23:38

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