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I understand that the expansion rate of the universe driven dark energy exceeds the rate at which the local group is being pulled toward The Great Attractor (Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster). Does this mean that the local group will be isolated from the Great Attractor and all other galaxies in 40 billion plus years.

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The Milky Way is receding from the members of the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster.

The Hydra cluster has a red shift of 0.0548.

The Centaurus cluster has a red shift of 0.0114.

The Norma cluster has a red shift of 0.0157.

The local group is and will continue moving away from the Hydra-Centaurus Supercluster.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your answer assumes that the influence on our local group from both whatever attractive forces the supercluster's attractor exerts (for simplification's sake let's say gravity) and whatever forces the dark energy exerts are constant relative each over time, correct? Is it possible to assume that given the relatively short window of time that our technology has allowed detailed observation of distant galaxies? $\endgroup$ – Jason R. Mick Jan 25 '17 at 23:44
  • $\begingroup$ @JasonR.Mick It seems like you are asking this question: physics.stackexchange.com/questions/21721/… $\endgroup$ – DavePhD Jan 26 '17 at 14:20

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