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India is about 8.5 hours ahead of US. If some person starts from India at 9 pm(according to his wrist watch) and reaches US in 2 hours(just assume),at that time his wrist watch will b showing 11 pm but as he his in US so he will have to match his watch according to US time so he will adjust his watch to 4:30 pm.This means that he is goin to live those 6.5 hours again in his life,but this time in US.So can this be considered as time travel or i am wrong.Please explain.

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    $\begingroup$ Better yet, if you buy old calendars off eBay, you can live entire years over again. I'm particularly fond of 1989. $\endgroup$
    – WillO
    Mar 29 '14 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ You have asked 3 questions and all 3 have been answered by a number of users in the community, but you haven't accepted a single answer from any of them. Please learn to accept answers if you want your questions to be taken seriously by the community. $\endgroup$
    – user42733
    Apr 1 '14 at 12:26
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In an inertial frame , the clocks at different points of space are synchronized. This synchronization issue is important. Once you synchronize Indian time with the American one, there is no paradox. So it is not a time travel. Anyways , the question was interesting.

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Time Travel does not mean going from one time zone to another. You did not get those 6.5 hours back again, they just appear to be back to you because you entered a different time zone.

I think this definition of Time Travel by David Lewis’ is perfect and will explain why you are wrong: An object time travels if and only if the difference between its departure and arrival times as measured in the surrounding world does not equal the duration of the journey undergone by the object.

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  • $\begingroup$ Comment to the answer (v1): Is it possible to provide a link or reference to the quote by David Lewis? $\endgroup$
    – Qmechanic
    Mar 29 '14 at 13:35
  • $\begingroup$ I could not find an official reference but it is mentioned here iep.utm.edu/timetrav $\endgroup$
    – user42733
    Mar 29 '14 at 16:05
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No, this is not time travel. Imagine you start in India and adjust your watch to US time before you leave. Nothing has changed. You have neither gained nor lost time, but when you get to the US your watch shows the correct local time.

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