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Why can we refer an object as being aerodynamic but we can't refer an object as being thermodynamic, and if an object is thermodynamic what does it even means?

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    $\begingroup$ Why do we drive on the parkway and park in the driveway? My point is that English is not consistent in meaning. $\endgroup$ Mar 24, 2014 at 11:58

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Calling something aerodynamic is shorthand for calling it aerodynamically efficient.

There's nothing wrong with referring to a system as thermodynamically efficient, it's just that this isn't usually shortened to thermodynamic.

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  • $\begingroup$ It may also mean having good aerodynamical properties (for example low drag). Term good aerodynamical properties isn't that unambiguous though. $\endgroup$
    – Wojciech
    Mar 24, 2014 at 9:00
  • $\begingroup$ Isn't low drag basically the same as aerodynamically efficient? $\endgroup$ Mar 24, 2014 at 9:03
  • $\begingroup$ Drag isn't the only aerodynamical property, although probably the most important one. When I hear efficient I immediately think about efficiency, i.e. "concept, quantitatively determined by the ratio of output to input". I'm not sure how to define input and output in aerodynamics in the proper way. Btw, I'm not contesting Your answer :) $\endgroup$
    – Wojciech
    Mar 24, 2014 at 9:21
  • $\begingroup$ In my first comment I meant good thermodynamical properties of course :) $\endgroup$
    – Wojciech
    Mar 24, 2014 at 10:10

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