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Well this is a fairly straightforward question. I know it states that either hidden variables is wrong or Quantum Mechanics. But indirectly hidden variables is a part of QM due to uncertainty. So what exactly does it violate. I am just a bit confused.

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    $\begingroup$ "But indirectly hidden variables is a part of QM due to uncertainty" What do you mean? You should realize that Bell's theorem tells us there are no local hidden variables, there is nothing to know than what QM can give us. $\endgroup$
    – Danu
    Mar 22, 2014 at 10:09
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    $\begingroup$ possible duplicate of What combinations of realism, non-locality, and contextuality are ruled out in quantum theory? $\endgroup$
    – Danu
    Mar 22, 2014 at 10:46
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    $\begingroup$ The common sense of young self-respecting humans is what it violates. $\endgroup$
    – BMS
    Mar 22, 2014 at 13:44
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    $\begingroup$ @Danu Well, it is Bell's theorem plus certain experimental results that tell us that. The theorem just says that a theory with local hidden variables in distinguishable from one without them. And it doesn't violate anything, except the expectations that BMS refers to. $\endgroup$ Mar 22, 2014 at 17:30

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