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Lets say we have a device that generates plasma fields; if this device creates plasma by heating a gas, where do the electrons that escaped the "orbits" of the atom go?

Would the electron physically shoot out of the atom at high speed and maybe be absorbed by another (plasma-less) atom? Is this a naïve intuition?

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    $\begingroup$ Plasmas are quasi-neutral, which means there are charged particles in the fluid, but the average electric charge is zero. That is to say, the electrons remain with the nucleons in the plasma state. $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Mar 5 '14 at 21:17
  • $\begingroup$ I believe the electrons orbit the plasma in an outer sphere to the positively charged plasma core. Also, I believe the direction of electron orbit would be such that wound tend to cancel the magnetic field caused by the rotation of the plasma core. $\endgroup$ – 0tyranny 0poverty Sep 28 '17 at 16:47
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in plasma electrons, ions and neutral atoms are all together in an overall neutral mix. so electrons are around, they don't go anywhere

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