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I have noticed many times that whenever I enter into the bathroom just after someone else bathed the temperature inside it would be high.

Is it that the body heat comes out when we pour a lot of water on our body? I asked many people this question but no one has the answer.

Note (from a comment) that this is in a warm climate where the bathwater is heated in the afternoons by sunlight on the storage tank, but not in the mornings; the heating of the bathroom is observed in either case. It's not a simple question of passing heated water through the bathroom.

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    $\begingroup$ Do you heat water before using it to bathe, or do you live in a warm climate so that you don't have to? $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 2:38
  • $\begingroup$ No, I live in a warm climate. I think I don't experience this temperature change when I myself have bathed. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 2:41
  • $\begingroup$ i.e when someone else baths and gets out of the bathroom and just my hand inside the bathroom is able to sense that heat. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 2:45
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    $\begingroup$ Even if the water is heated by a water heater, it could be heated by the sun depending on the location of the pipes. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 3:03
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    $\begingroup$ @ChrisWhite The water comes from a black 500L tank on the roof. The water gets pretty hot after noon but I experience this(bathroom getting hot) almost any time. Three walls of the bathroom are subjected to sun. Bathroom is big enough to contain a closet,a person and a bathtub. An LED bulb is used for its lightning but I have experienced this with different bathrooms with different lighting,size and surroundings. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 3:41

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If the water isn't heated, the only effect I can see is that the humidity is higher. If the ambient temperature is high, this will feel hotter. Have you measured the temperature,or are you relying on your sensation?

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    $\begingroup$ The water isn't heated, if I understand correctly. It's hot in India. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 2:43
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    $\begingroup$ @RossMillikan I was relying on my sensation.But I checked many times and each time the same result of being hot inside the bathroom. I think I should make the observation more quantitative by means of a thermometer. $\endgroup$ Feb 24, 2014 at 3:17
  • $\begingroup$ Indeed you feel more the heat (or cold) when air is wetter. But there might be a way the temperature increases if the shower brings small drops of water or vapor in the air due to the water pressure. These smalls drops or molecules will condense on the floor and on the walls. This causes the temperature of the air to increase. I can explain more if you need. It's the same process that increases temperature when it starts to rain. $\endgroup$
    – ceillac
    Apr 6, 2015 at 13:43
  • $\begingroup$ If the drops were already water, moving them to the walls won't generate any heat. True, if you cause vapor that was in the bath to condense you will. I don't see why shower water would cause this. $\endgroup$ Apr 6, 2015 at 13:48
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Inside the bathroom after a shower, the humidity rises and thus, the feeling of more warmth as it pertains to higher temperatures(warm air holds more moisture than cold air). In other words, it may be a similar temperature just outside the bathroom but the rise in humidity inside will make it feel much warmer for a short time. The size of the room and other parameters can also have a slight affect but as a general rule, this will happen in any bathroom that does not have proper ventilation(a properly sized fan that can cycle out the moisture) where the water is artificially heated in cold weather or is already hot in a situation such as yours. The humidity will go up with cold water as well but the resulting temperature effect will be much less noticeable in part because cold air can't hold as much moisture.

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we feel warm after the bath in the bathroom because as the temperature of the water is cool when compare to temperature of the body.So,that the body cools & the surrounding temperature become hot or warm(humidity).

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    $\begingroup$ Note that the question says "somebody else" has bathed. So it can't be that the water has cooled the person who feels the bathroom as warmer. Furthermore, a bath is usually drawn at temperatures above body temperature $\endgroup$
    – Jim
    Mar 27, 2015 at 15:29
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It is because by bathing in cold water the heat energy of the body is given to the cool water.This rises the temperature of the air inside the bathroom which we can not feel because our body has already attained the thermal equilibrium with the air inside.

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  • $\begingroup$ Let me get this straight: Heat goes from the body to the water and then to the air. Then the heat goes back to our body as our internal temperature equilibrates with the rest of the room? If this is your answer, I think that it's wrong. It goes against the second law of thermodynamics. If it's not, please reformulate it. $\endgroup$ Apr 6, 2015 at 12:44
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I think that the main effect is that because humidity is increased, your sweat does not evaporate much when entering the bathroom. Since the evaporation of sweat makes you feel colder (that is what sweat is for!), you would feel warm in the bathroom.

Using hot water may increase the temperature of the room as well.

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Heat is essentially atoms gaining energy. The energy in the bath is carried out into the rest of the room (if the water is heated)

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