2 added 7 characters in body
source | link

Will we see more stars?

The big bang blasted matter in all directions, resulting in the particles moving away from each other. These slowed down due to gravitation pull on each other. First forming small clumps todue to their proximity, later with the clumps of clumps pulling together. This process keeps going recursively eventually forming stars, planets, and other cosmic bodies, grouping together to form solar systems, galaxies, etc.

The stars eventually die when their fuel run out, collapsing in on their own weight, with the more massive ones forming black holes. Eventually over time everything starts pulling closer to each other due to the gravity between them, the solar systems are pulled into the center of their galaxies, the galaxies pull on each other and combine to form bigger galaxies, and even the black holes and massive black holes at the center of galaxies swallow each other to form even bigger black holes. In the end the entire universe collapses in on itself, perhaps resulting in another big bang, with the whole process starting all over again.

So the bigger question to your question is rather to which stage in this life-cycle of universal evolution are you referring to? We could say that at the moment of the big bang there were no stars because massive volumes of gas have not yet have the chance to form, nevertheless had the chance to start to compact to build up pressure and form stars due to their size and gravity.

Or are you referring to a later stage in this life-cycle, when most of the matter were still moving away from each other, forming starts and galaxies along the way, during this time there will be an increase in the number of stars formed.

Or are you referring to when everything collapses in on each other, when there will be less stars formed, with supernova explosions along the way and new gas clouds being formed, which may eventually create new stars, but are ultimately also swallowed by other stars and black holes, eventually resulting in fewer stars.

Can stellar objects go outside the scope of the observable universe?

The observable universe is only a tiny speck compared the the actual size of the universe. With "us" as the observer, we can only observe as much as our technology allows, there will always be something further that we cannot get to though observation, for example, has any of our technology been able to look though a black hole so see what is on the other side? With refraction and gravity, light and energy can slightly bend around objects, but we cannot see what is exactly closely behind the black hole. And in most cases we cannot observe everything in the spectrum of waves, for example to see what's on the other side of a dark cloud of matter, you would rather resort to far-infrared imaging.

Calculations?

Being a maths and physics nut myself, I just crave any opportunity to scribble formulas down and work stuff out, but in this case you would have to be more specific of what you want to calculate, and "when" this calculation should be performed.

Number of Stars at Start of Time = 0

Number of Stars at this moment = sum of stars in all solar systems in all galaxies

Basically it's uncountable since we cannot count, or even approximate, what we have no idea of what the boundaries are.

Will we see more stars?

The big bang blasted matter in all directions, resulting in the particles moving away from each other. These slowed down due to gravitation pull on each other. First forming small clumps to to proximity, later with the clumps of clumps pulling together. This process keeps going recursively eventually forming stars, planets, and other cosmic bodies, grouping together to form solar systems, galaxies, etc.

The stars eventually die when their fuel run out, collapsing in on their own weight, with the more massive ones forming black holes. Eventually over time everything starts pulling closer to each other due to the gravity between them, the solar systems are pulled into the center of their galaxies, the galaxies pull on each other and combine to form bigger galaxies, and even the black holes and massive black holes at the center of galaxies swallow each other to form even bigger black holes. In the end the entire universe collapses in on itself, perhaps resulting in another big bang, with the whole process starting all over again.

So the bigger question to your question is rather to which stage in this life-cycle of universal evolution are you referring to? We could say that at the moment of the big bang there were no stars because massive volumes of gas have not yet have the chance to form, nevertheless had the chance to start to compact to build up pressure and form stars due to their size and gravity.

Or are you referring to a later stage in this life-cycle, when most of the matter were still moving away from each other, forming starts and galaxies along the way, during this time there will be an increase in the number of stars formed.

Or are you referring to when everything collapses in on each other, when there will be less stars formed, with supernova explosions along the way and new gas clouds being formed, which may eventually create new stars, but are ultimately also swallowed by other stars and black holes, eventually resulting in fewer stars.

Can stellar objects go outside the scope of the observable universe?

The observable universe is only a tiny speck compared the the actual size of the universe. With "us" as the observer, we can only observe as much as our technology allows, there will always be something further that we cannot get to though observation, for example, has any of our technology been able to look though a black hole so see what is on the other side? With refraction and gravity, light and energy can slightly bend around objects, but we cannot see what is exactly closely behind the black hole. And in most cases we cannot observe everything in the spectrum of waves, for example to see what's on the other side of a dark cloud of matter, you would rather resort to far-infrared imaging.

Calculations?

Being a maths and physics nut myself, I just crave any opportunity to scribble formulas down and work stuff out, but in this case you would have to be more specific of what you want to calculate, and "when" this calculation should be performed.

Number of Stars at Start of Time = 0

Number of Stars at this moment = sum of stars in all solar systems in all galaxies

Basically it's uncountable since we cannot count, or even approximate, what we have no idea of what the boundaries are.

Will we see more stars?

The big bang blasted matter in all directions, resulting in the particles moving away from each other. These slowed down due to gravitation pull on each other. First forming small clumps due to their proximity, later with the clumps of clumps pulling together. This process keeps going recursively eventually forming stars, planets, and other cosmic bodies, grouping together to form solar systems, galaxies, etc.

The stars eventually die when their fuel run out, collapsing in on their own weight, with the more massive ones forming black holes. Eventually over time everything starts pulling closer to each other due to the gravity between them, the solar systems are pulled into the center of their galaxies, the galaxies pull on each other and combine to form bigger galaxies, and even the black holes and massive black holes at the center of galaxies swallow each other to form even bigger black holes. In the end the entire universe collapses in on itself, perhaps resulting in another big bang, with the whole process starting all over again.

So the bigger question to your question is rather to which stage in this life-cycle of universal evolution are you referring to? We could say that at the moment of the big bang there were no stars because massive volumes of gas have not yet have the chance to form, nevertheless had the chance to start to compact to build up pressure and form stars due to their size and gravity.

Or are you referring to a later stage in this life-cycle, when most of the matter were still moving away from each other, forming starts and galaxies along the way, during this time there will be an increase in the number of stars formed.

Or are you referring to when everything collapses in on each other, when there will be less stars formed, with supernova explosions along the way and new gas clouds being formed, which may eventually create new stars, but are ultimately also swallowed by other stars and black holes, eventually resulting in fewer stars.

Can stellar objects go outside the scope of the observable universe?

The observable universe is only a tiny speck compared the the actual size of the universe. With "us" as the observer, we can only observe as much as our technology allows, there will always be something further that we cannot get to though observation, for example, has any of our technology been able to look though a black hole so see what is on the other side? With refraction and gravity, light and energy can slightly bend around objects, but we cannot see what is exactly closely behind the black hole. And in most cases we cannot observe everything in the spectrum of waves, for example to see what's on the other side of a dark cloud of matter, you would rather resort to far-infrared imaging.

Calculations?

Being a maths and physics nut myself, I just crave any opportunity to scribble formulas down and work stuff out, but in this case you would have to be more specific of what you want to calculate, and "when" this calculation should be performed.

Number of Stars at Start of Time = 0

Number of Stars at this moment = sum of stars in all solar systems in all galaxies

Basically it's uncountable since we cannot count, or even approximate, what we have no idea of what the boundaries are.

1
source | link

Will we see more stars?

The big bang blasted matter in all directions, resulting in the particles moving away from each other. These slowed down due to gravitation pull on each other. First forming small clumps to to proximity, later with the clumps of clumps pulling together. This process keeps going recursively eventually forming stars, planets, and other cosmic bodies, grouping together to form solar systems, galaxies, etc.

The stars eventually die when their fuel run out, collapsing in on their own weight, with the more massive ones forming black holes. Eventually over time everything starts pulling closer to each other due to the gravity between them, the solar systems are pulled into the center of their galaxies, the galaxies pull on each other and combine to form bigger galaxies, and even the black holes and massive black holes at the center of galaxies swallow each other to form even bigger black holes. In the end the entire universe collapses in on itself, perhaps resulting in another big bang, with the whole process starting all over again.

So the bigger question to your question is rather to which stage in this life-cycle of universal evolution are you referring to? We could say that at the moment of the big bang there were no stars because massive volumes of gas have not yet have the chance to form, nevertheless had the chance to start to compact to build up pressure and form stars due to their size and gravity.

Or are you referring to a later stage in this life-cycle, when most of the matter were still moving away from each other, forming starts and galaxies along the way, during this time there will be an increase in the number of stars formed.

Or are you referring to when everything collapses in on each other, when there will be less stars formed, with supernova explosions along the way and new gas clouds being formed, which may eventually create new stars, but are ultimately also swallowed by other stars and black holes, eventually resulting in fewer stars.

Can stellar objects go outside the scope of the observable universe?

The observable universe is only a tiny speck compared the the actual size of the universe. With "us" as the observer, we can only observe as much as our technology allows, there will always be something further that we cannot get to though observation, for example, has any of our technology been able to look though a black hole so see what is on the other side? With refraction and gravity, light and energy can slightly bend around objects, but we cannot see what is exactly closely behind the black hole. And in most cases we cannot observe everything in the spectrum of waves, for example to see what's on the other side of a dark cloud of matter, you would rather resort to far-infrared imaging.

Calculations?

Being a maths and physics nut myself, I just crave any opportunity to scribble formulas down and work stuff out, but in this case you would have to be more specific of what you want to calculate, and "when" this calculation should be performed.

Number of Stars at Start of Time = 0

Number of Stars at this moment = sum of stars in all solar systems in all galaxies

Basically it's uncountable since we cannot count, or even approximate, what we have no idea of what the boundaries are.