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The acceleration of the Moon due to the force of the Earth is perpendicular to the velocity of the Moon. That's why the path of the moon is a circle. The same is true concerning the acceleration of the Earth due to the force of the Moon. The acceleration of the Earth is perpendicular to its velocity. Hence it does not "accumulate"; the Earth follows a circular path, as does the Moon.

In fact, the Moon does not orbit the Earth. It orbits the common center of mass of the Earth-Moon system. The same is true of the Earth; it orbits the common center of mass. However, the center of mass of the system lies inside the Earth, so the radius of the Earth's orbit is much smaller than the radius of the Moon's orbit, and is ignored for many purposes. It is detectable, and must be taken into account when doing precise astronomical calculations.

While it is true that the orbits are actually elliptical, that fact has no bearing whatsoever on the question of whether or not acceleration accumulates.

The acceleration of the Moon due to the force of the Earth is perpendicular to the velocity of the Moon. That's why the path of the moon is a circle. The same is true concerning the acceleration of the Earth due to the force of the Moon. The acceleration of the Earth is perpendicular to its velocity. Hence it does not "accumulate"; the Earth follows a circular path, as does the Moon.

In fact, the Moon does not orbit the Earth. It orbits the common center of mass of the Earth-Moon system. The same is true of the Earth; it orbits the common center of mass. However, the center of mass of the system lies inside the Earth, so the radius of the Earth's orbit is much smaller than the radius of the Moon's orbit, and is ignored for many purposes. It is detectable, and must be taken into account when doing precise astronomical calculations.

The acceleration of the Moon due to the force of the Earth is perpendicular to the velocity of the Moon. That's why the path of the moon is a circle. The same is true concerning the acceleration of the Earth due to the force of the Moon. The acceleration of the Earth is perpendicular to its velocity. Hence it does not "accumulate"; the Earth follows a circular path, as does the Moon.

In fact, the Moon does not orbit the Earth. It orbits the common center of mass of the Earth-Moon system. The same is true of the Earth; it orbits the common center of mass. However, the center of mass of the system lies inside the Earth, so the radius of the Earth's orbit is much smaller than the radius of the Moon's orbit, and is ignored for many purposes. It is detectable, and must be taken into account when doing precise astronomical calculations.

While it is true that the orbits are actually elliptical, that fact has no bearing whatsoever on the question of whether or not acceleration accumulates.

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The acceleration of the Moon due to the force of the Earth is perpendicular to the velocity of the Moon. That's why the path of the moon is a circle. The same is true concerning the acceleration of the Earth due to the force of the Moon. The acceleration of the Earth is perpendicular to its velocity. Hence it does not "accumulate"; the Earth follows a circular path, as does the Moon.

In fact, the Moon does not orbit the Earth. It orbits the common center of mass of the Earth-Moon system. The same is true of the Earth; it orbits the common center of mass. However, the center of mass of the system lies inside the Earth, so the radius of the Earth's orbit is much smaller than the radius of the Moon's orbit, and is ignored for many purposes. It is detectable, and must be taken into account when doing precise astronomical calculations.