4 replaced http://physics.stackexchange.com/ with https://physics.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Possible Duplicate:
Black hole formation as seen by a distant observerBlack hole formation as seen by a distant observer

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

Possible Duplicate:
Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

Possible Duplicate:
Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

3 insert duplicate link
source | link

Possible Duplicate:
Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

Possible Duplicate:
Black hole formation as seen by a distant observer

I've read in several places that from the PoV of a distant observer it will take an infinite amount of time for new matter to fall past the event horizon into a black hole, due to time dilation effects.

This seems to imply that once a black hole is formed, its mass cannot actually grow any further as considered by most observers in the universe. Is that right?

    Post Closed as "exact duplicate" by dmckee of
2 edited tags
| link
1
source | link