Bounty Ended with 50 reputation awarded by PM 2Ring
7 added 156 characters in body
source | link

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $x$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,778\,\mathrm{K}$$T_\odot \simeq 5\,780\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte (Bladry et al. 2001). Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ — where the temperatures was $1600\mathrm{K} \gtrsim T \gtrsim 500\mathrm{K}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could in principle still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $x$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,778\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte. Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $x$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,780\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte (Bladry et al. 2001). Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ — where the temperatures was $1600\mathrm{K} \gtrsim T \gtrsim 500\mathrm{K}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could in principle still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

6 added 27 characters in body
source | link

BtUniverseColor

$^\dagger$I wrote a Python code called timeline to calculate $\ell$ and other quantities of the Universe as a function of time, available on GitHub here.

Bt

$^\dagger$I wrote a Python code called timeline to calculate $\ell$ and other quantities of the Universe as a , available on GitHub here.

UniverseColor

$^\dagger$I wrote a Python code called timeline to calculate $\ell$ and other quantities of the Universe as a function of time, available on GitHub here.

5 Fixed typo
source | link

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $y$$x$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,778\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte. Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $y$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,778\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte. Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

The figure below shows, in green, the brightness of the CMB as a function of time after the Big Bang. A secondary $x$ axis on top show the corresponding temperature of the Universe. The background color shows the color of the Universe as would be perceived by a human being, calculated by convolving the spectrum of the radiation with the response function of the human eye: The first few tens of thousands of years, the Universe is a pale sapphire blue, turning white as it reaches the temperature of the Sun ($T_\odot \simeq 5\,778\,\mathrm{K}$). At $t\sim200\,\mathrm{Myr}$, stars begin to form and the calculation of the spectrum becomes more complicated (so I've grayed it it out), but today the Universe has reached a cosmic latte. Note that, as mentioned above, only between $t\sim1\,\mathrm{Myr}$ and $t\sim6\,\mathrm{Myr}$ could you actually see anything; prior to this epoch you'd go blind, and after this epoch, it'd be too dim (but you could still see the color using sunglasses/binoculars, respectively).

4 edited body
source | link
3 Plotted B(t)
source | link
2 Discussed brightness today
source | link
1
source | link