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We don't need an atomic model to explain Kirchhoff's current law (KCL). The electron configuration in the atom, or the type of atom for that matter, has no influence on KCL.

Such factors may influence the amount of current and the resistance and nanoscopic behaviour - but it doesn't influence the fact that all charge entering must also be leaving every second at any point in a steady circuit. All we need to consider to intuitively accept that fact is what steady current actually means.

Because, KCL only applies for steady currents.

We call a current steady when it is constant and unchanging over time.

At any point in such a steady (constant-current) circuit, if, say, 10 charges enter every second, then also 10 charges must leave that point every second. Otherwise, charge would accumulate there. If charge accumulated there, then theirthe accumulating electric field would grow and grow and soon start to prevent otherfurther charges from arriving. This would slow down the current.

But if the current slowed down, we wouldn't call it steady.

Since this doesn't happen (in a steady circuit, current is constant), charge accumulation cannot be taking place. If charge is not accumulating anywhere, then everywhere, all that is entering must also be leaving any section or point in the circuit. And this is the point of KCL.

In non-steady circuits, such as a circuit with a capacitor that is being charged (charge would then be accumulating at the capacitor plate), KCL doesn't apply.

We don't need an atomic model to explain Kirchhoff's current law (KCL). The electron configuration in the atom, or the type of atom for that matter, has no influence on KCL.

Such factors may influence the amount of current and the resistance and nanoscopic behaviour - but it doesn't influence the fact that all charge entering must also be leaving every second at any point in a steady circuit. All we need to consider to intuitively accept that fact is what steady current actually means.

Because, KCL only applies for steady currents.

We call a current steady when it is constant and unchanging over time.

At any point in such a steady (constant-current) circuit, if, say, 10 charges enter every second, then also 10 charges must leave that point every second. Otherwise, charge would accumulate. If charge accumulated, then their accumulating electric field would grow and start to prevent other charges from arriving. This would slow down the current.

Since this doesn't happen (in a steady circuit, current is constant), charge accumulation cannot be taking place. If charge is not accumulating anywhere, then everywhere, all that is entering must also be leaving any section or point in the circuit.

In non-steady circuits, such as a circuit with a capacitor that is being charged, KCL doesn't apply.

We don't need an atomic model to explain Kirchhoff's current law (KCL). The electron configuration in the atom, or the type of atom for that matter, has no influence on KCL.

Such factors may influence the amount of current and the resistance and nanoscopic behaviour - but it doesn't influence the fact that all charge entering must also be leaving every second at any point in a steady circuit. All we need to consider to intuitively accept that fact is what steady current actually means.

Because, KCL only applies for steady currents.

We call a current steady when it is constant and unchanging over time.

At any point in such a steady (constant-current) circuit, if, say, 10 charges enter every second, then also 10 charges must leave that point every second. Otherwise, charge would accumulate there. If charge accumulated there, then the accumulating electric field would grow and grow and soon start to prevent further charges from arriving. This would slow down the current.

But if the current slowed down, we wouldn't call it steady.

Since this doesn't happen (in a steady circuit, current is constant), charge accumulation cannot be taking place. If charge is not accumulating anywhere, then everywhere, all that is entering must also be leaving any section or point in the circuit. And this is the point of KCL.

In non-steady circuits, such as a circuit with a capacitor that is being charged (charge would then be accumulating at the capacitor plate), KCL doesn't apply.

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source | link

We don't need an atomic model to explain Kirchhoff's current law (KCL). The electron configuration in the atom, or the type of atom for that matter, has no influence on KCL.

Such factors may influence the amount of current and the resistance and nanoscopic behaviour - but it doesn't influence the fact that all charge entering must also be leaving every second at any point in a steady circuit. All we need to consider to intuitively accept that fact is what steady current actually means.

Because, KCL only applies for steady currents.

We call a current steady when it is constant and unchanging over time.

At any point in such a steady (constant-current) circuit, if, say, 10 charges enter every second, then also 10 charges must leave that point every second. Otherwise, charge would accumulate. If charge accumulated, then their accumulating electric field would grow and start to prevent other charges from arriving. This would slow down the current.

Since this doesn't happen (in a steady circuit, current is constant), charge accumulation cannot be taking place. If charge is not accumulating anywhere, then everywhere, all that is entering must also be leaving any section or point in the circuit.

In non-steady circuits, such as a circuit with a capacitor that is being charged, KCL doesn't apply.