Improved Formatting
Source Link
Kyle Kanos
  • 23.8k
  • 41
  • 58
  • 110

For an object that is at a distance $R$ from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance $R+A$, we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied.

Similarly if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A) $R-A$,we will do negative work  (it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement).

Hence, in both the cases, is the direction of force applied the same  (in the direction of increase in distance)?

Also if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance $R-A$, we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

For an object that is at a distance $R$ from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance $R+A$, we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied.

Similarly if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A),we will do negative work(it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement).

Hence, in both the cases, is the direction of force applied the same(in the direction of increase in distance)?

Also if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance $R-A$, we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

For an object that is at a distance $R$ from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance $R+A$, we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied.

Similarly if we want to do move it closer to a distance $R-A$,we will do negative work  (it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement).

Hence, in both the cases, is the direction of force applied the same  (in the direction of increase in distance)?

Also if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance $R-A$, we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

For an object that is at a distance R$R$ from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance(R+A) $R+A$, we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied,.

Similarly if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A),we will do negative work( itit means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement),.

Hence, in both casethe cases, is the direction of force applied the same( inin the direction of increase in distance)? And

Also if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance (R-A)$R-A$, we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

For an object that is at a distance R from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance(R+A), we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied, if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A),we will do negative work( it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement), Hence, in both case, is the direction of force applied the same( in the direction of increase in distance)? And if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance (R-A), we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

For an object that is at a distance $R$ from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance $R+A$, we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied.

Similarly if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A),we will do negative work(it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement).

Hence, in both the cases, is the direction of force applied the same(in the direction of increase in distance)?

Also if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance $R-A$, we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?

Source Link

Direction of work done in gravitational field

For an object that is at a distance R from the earth core, if we want to move it further away to a distance(R+A), we will do positive work on it since the direction of displacement is in the same direction of force we applied, if we want to do move it closer to a distance(R-A),we will do negative work( it means applied force is in the opposite direction of displacement), Hence, in both case, is the direction of force applied the same( in the direction of increase in distance)? And if we want to move an object from infinity to a distance (R-A), we will also be applying force in the direction of increase in distance hence providing a negative work?