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2 added how interaction rates are commonly calculated
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There are time-scales related to interactions, or, equivalently, interaction rates. These interaction rates are often calculated in lowest order based on Fermi’s Golden Rule. An experiment that measures electron interference needs to make sure that the time-of-flight of the electrons from the electron source to the observation screen is much shorter than any of the time-scales of possible interactions.

In interference experiments, we therefore define a coherence time for the interfering particles.

In real experiments, we do indeed face the problem of shielding particles from being measured by the environment, before they interfere. For example, in electron interferometers realized in solid-state devices, we have to go to very low temperatures, where the interactions between electrons and phonons become very 'slow' (their rate becomes very small). We also have to make sure that the devices are small enough that the Coulomb-interaction between electrons, which persists even at the lowest temperatures, does not spoil the interference (the decoherence rate due to electron-electron interaction does also depend on temperature: the rate becomes smaller with decreasing temperature).

There are time-scales related to interactions, or, equivalently, interaction rates. An experiment that measures electron interference needs to make sure that the time-of-flight of the electrons from the electron source to the observation screen is much shorter than any of the time-scales of possible interactions.

In interference experiments, we therefore define a coherence time for the interfering particles.

In real experiments, we do indeed face the problem of shielding particles from being measured by the environment, before they interfere. For example, in electron interferometers realized in solid-state devices, we have to go to very low temperatures, where the interactions between electrons and phonons become very 'slow' (their rate becomes very small). We also have to make sure that the devices are small enough that the Coulomb-interaction between electrons, which persists even at the lowest temperatures, does not spoil the interference (the decoherence rate due to electron-electron interaction does also depend on temperature: the rate becomes smaller with decreasing temperature).

There are time-scales related to interactions, or, equivalently, interaction rates. These interaction rates are often calculated in lowest order based on Fermi’s Golden Rule. An experiment that measures electron interference needs to make sure that the time-of-flight of the electrons from the electron source to the observation screen is much shorter than any of the time-scales of possible interactions.

In interference experiments, we therefore define a coherence time for the interfering particles.

In real experiments, we do indeed face the problem of shielding particles from being measured by the environment, before they interfere. For example, in electron interferometers realized in solid-state devices, we have to go to very low temperatures, where the interactions between electrons and phonons become very 'slow' (their rate becomes very small). We also have to make sure that the devices are small enough that the Coulomb-interaction between electrons, which persists even at the lowest temperatures, does not spoil the interference (the decoherence rate due to electron-electron interaction does also depend on temperature: the rate becomes smaller with decreasing temperature).

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source | link

There are time-scales related to interactions, or, equivalently, interaction rates. An experiment that measures electron interference needs to make sure that the time-of-flight of the electrons from the electron source to the observation screen is much shorter than any of the time-scales of possible interactions.

In interference experiments, we therefore define a coherence time for the interfering particles.

In real experiments, we do indeed face the problem of shielding particles from being measured by the environment, before they interfere. For example, in electron interferometers realized in solid-state devices, we have to go to very low temperatures, where the interactions between electrons and phonons become very 'slow' (their rate becomes very small). We also have to make sure that the devices are small enough that the Coulomb-interaction between electrons, which persists even at the lowest temperatures, does not spoil the interference (the decoherence rate due to electron-electron interaction does also depend on temperature: the rate becomes smaller with decreasing temperature).