4 Misspellings fixed
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First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckonsbeacons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckonsbeacons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

The facility where I didworked on my dissertation at washad an electron beam machine where the prompt bremstrahlung level would be pretty bad. The LHC is proton machine and as long as the beam steering is good the tunnel itself is probably a little cooler, but I still wouldn't want to spend any time there while the beam was on: I intend to get to my old age with little enough professional dose that I don't need to blame any cancer that I get on my work.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

The facility I did my dissertation at was an electron beam machine where the prompt bremstrahlung level would be pretty bad. The LHC is proton machine and as long as the beam steering is good the tunnel itself is probably a little cooler, but I still wouldn't want to spend any time there while the beam was on: I intend to get to my old age with little enough professional dose that I don't need to blame any cancer that I get on my work.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beacons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beacons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

The facility where I worked on my dissertation had an electron beam machine where the prompt bremstrahlung level would be pretty bad. The LHC is proton machine and as long as the beam steering is good the tunnel itself is probably a little cooler, but I still wouldn't want to spend any time there while the beam was on: I intend to get to my old age with little enough professional dose that I don't need to blame any cancer that I get on my work.

3 added 450 characters in body
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First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

The facility I did my dissertation at was an electron beam machine where the prompt bremstrahlung level would be pretty bad. The LHC is proton machine and as long as the beam steering is good the tunnel itself is probably a little cooler, but I still wouldn't want to spend any time there while the beam was on: I intend to get to my old age with little enough professional dose that I don't need to blame any cancer that I get on my work.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

The facility I did my dissertation at was an electron beam machine where the prompt bremstrahlung level would be pretty bad. The LHC is proton machine and as long as the beam steering is good the tunnel itself is probably a little cooler, but I still wouldn't want to spend any time there while the beam was on: I intend to get to my old age with little enough professional dose that I don't need to blame any cancer that I get on my work.

2 added 784 characters in body
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First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental hall, wherehalls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental hall, where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there.

First of all, no one could be inside the collider itself: the beam pipe and other component are simply not big enough and in any case are kept under a high quality vacuum, so you'd have other things on your mind.

The concern is that they would be in the tunnel or one of the experimental halls where they would encounter non-trivial radiation levels when the beam was turned on. In some places (such as near beam dumps) the peak level could be lethal in a very short time. In most places it will be hot enough that you really want to leave, but cool enough that you'd have time to notice the warning beckons and take some action to get out of there before your were facing a short term risk of death.

A considerable amount of effort goes into insuring that this does not happen. Things like

  • Locking the enclosures and making an exhaustive search when you are coming out of maintenance mode and toward run mode, and interlocking the beam on all the doors (i.e. these portals must be secure before the beam can come on).
  • Allowing entry into the enclosures only in teams and carrying a physical interlock token (key) when entry must be made during a run. The interlock prevents the beam from coming on, and as long as you have your key in your pocket you know you are safe.
  • Having cameras that survey all parts of the enclosures which can be viewed from the control rooms, and using these for a second survey of the enclosures.
  • Having flashing beckons in the enclosures to alert anyone who somehow is there that all is not right, and big red panic buttons to kill the beam if you find yourself in that position.
  • Making everyone allowed into those parts of the site without escort take a training course that covers these things.
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