Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
3 added 20 characters in body
source | link

If I take an hammer and slam it on a table, I will not be surprised to see the table breaking and my anger slowly vanishing.
I remember a difference being made between impact and non-impact forces when I was in high school, but I can't really say how much was related.
Now, I'm older and Ibut I'm still meditate onmeditating if a stronger gravitational pull will eventaully rbeakbreak things apart (like a table).
I might guess a link with why the fire is burning in the sun, and its constant fusion(fission?). An attempt :)
We, inhabitants of earth, know we can break things by applying a certain force to an object. I don't think impact time play an important role, as long as the force is of the same degree ( there is a misconception that a force should be applied for a very brief time, but I think what is usually meant is the impulse should rather be short ). Impact area seems relevant instead. Everyday experience seems to suggest that if you apply the same force it's easier to penetrate a table if you use a needle rather than a phone.
Again, It seems to me, but I might be wrong.
Anyway, force of gravity seems to act on everthing ( and everything's center of mass/gravity), but it apparently doesn't have any other effect ofexcept for pulling down things. It does not break them, at least, because I've(I've read that it does deform them on the atomic).
Moreover, is there really a difference between impact and non impact-forces? Even fif we suppose the existence of gravitons? :)

If I take an hammer and slam it on a table, I will not be surprised to see the table breaking and my anger slowly vanishing.
I remember a difference being made between impact and non-impact forces when I was in high school, but I can't really say how much was related.
Now, I'm older and I still meditate on if a stronger gravitational pull will eventaully rbeak things apart (like a table).
I might guess a link with why the fire is burning, and its constant fusion(fission?). An attempt :)
We, inhabitants of earth, know we can break things by applying a certain force to an object. I don't think impact time play an important role, as long as the force is of the same degree ( there is a misconception that a force should be applied for a very brief time, but I think what is usually meant is the impulse should rather be short ). Impact area seems relevant instead. Everyday experience seems to suggest that if you apply the same force it's easier to penetrate a table if you use a needle rather than a phone.
Again, It seems to me, but I might be wrong.
Anyway, force of gravity seems to act on everthing ( and everything's center of mass/gravity), but it apparently have any other effect of pulling down things. It does not break them, at least, because I've read that it does deform them on the atomic.
Moreover, is there really a difference between impact and non impact-forces? Even f we suppose the existence of gravitons? :)

If I take an hammer and slam it on a table, I will not be surprised to see the table breaking and my anger slowly vanishing.
I remember a difference being made between impact and non-impact forces when I was in high school, but I can't really say how much was related.
Now, I'm older but I'm still meditating if a stronger gravitational pull will eventaully break things apart (like a table).
I might guess a link with why the fire is burning in the sun, and its constant fusion(fission?). An attempt :)
We, inhabitants of earth, know we can break things by applying a certain force to an object. I don't think impact time play an important role, as long as the force is of the same degree ( there is a misconception that a force should be applied for a very brief time, but I think what is usually meant is the impulse should rather be short ). Impact area seems relevant instead. Everyday experience seems to suggest that if you apply the same force it's easier to penetrate a table if you use a needle rather than a phone.
Again, It seems to me, but I might be wrong.
Anyway, force of gravity seems to act on everthing ( and everything's center of mass/gravity), but it apparently doesn't have any other effect except for pulling down things. It does not break them, at least(I've read that it does deform them on the atomic).
Moreover, is there really a difference between impact and non impact-forces? Even if we suppose the existence of gravitons? :)

2 edited title
| link

Would a very strong force of gravity makes thingmake things break apart?

1
source | link

Would a very strong force of gravity makes thing break apart?

If I take an hammer and slam it on a table, I will not be surprised to see the table breaking and my anger slowly vanishing.
I remember a difference being made between impact and non-impact forces when I was in high school, but I can't really say how much was related.
Now, I'm older and I still meditate on if a stronger gravitational pull will eventaully rbeak things apart (like a table).
I might guess a link with why the fire is burning, and its constant fusion(fission?). An attempt :)
We, inhabitants of earth, know we can break things by applying a certain force to an object. I don't think impact time play an important role, as long as the force is of the same degree ( there is a misconception that a force should be applied for a very brief time, but I think what is usually meant is the impulse should rather be short ). Impact area seems relevant instead. Everyday experience seems to suggest that if you apply the same force it's easier to penetrate a table if you use a needle rather than a phone.
Again, It seems to me, but I might be wrong.
Anyway, force of gravity seems to act on everthing ( and everything's center of mass/gravity), but it apparently have any other effect of pulling down things. It does not break them, at least, because I've read that it does deform them on the atomic.
Moreover, is there really a difference between impact and non impact-forces? Even f we suppose the existence of gravitons? :)