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If a car hits a wall at thea speed of v$v$, and an identical car hits a wall at a speed of 2v$2\,v$, with the kinetic energy equation KE = 1/2mv^2$E_K = \frac{1}{2}mv^2$ (the speed goes from v$v$ to 0$0$) the second car will lose 4 times the energy, and therefore cause 4 times the damage, but with the force equation F = ma$F = ma$ (the car hits the wall and decelerates), it will hit with 2 times the force, and cause 2 times the damage. 

How can this be explained?

If a car hits a wall at the speed of v, and an identical car hits a wall at a speed of 2v, with the kinetic energy equation KE = 1/2mv^2 (the speed goes from v to 0) the second car will lose 4 times the energy, and therefore cause 4 times the damage, but with the force equation F = ma (the car hits the wall and decelerates), it will hit with 2 times the force, and cause 2 times the damage. How can this be explained?

If a car hits a wall at a speed of $v$, and an identical car hits a wall at a speed of $2\,v$, with the kinetic energy equation $E_K = \frac{1}{2}mv^2$ (the speed goes from $v$ to $0$) the second car will lose 4 times the energy, and therefore cause 4 times the damage, but with the force equation $F = ma$ (the car hits the wall and decelerates), it will hit with 2 times the force, and cause 2 times the damage. 

How can this be explained?

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Please help understanding the difference between force and kinetic energy for an object hitting a wall?

If a car hits a wall at the speed of v, and an identical car hits a wall at a speed of 2v, with the kinetic energy equation KE = 1/2mv^2 (the speed goes from v to 0) the second car will lose 4 times the energy, and therefore cause 4 times the damage, but with the force equation F = ma (the car hits the wall and decelerates), it will hit with 2 times the force, and cause 2 times the damage. How can this be explained?