2 added 1034 characters in body
source | link

It is correct for the mathematical models used in particle physics studies. Because the electron interacts electromagnetically, and there are not only the real photons but also the virtual photons

virtual

which transfer the momentum and the quantum numbers in the interaction described by integrals over the variables. So conceptually there is always a photon intermediary in any everyday interaction of an electron. ( it also interacts with the weak and the gravitational but these are very weak effects, outside our measuring capabilities). An electron interacting with an electron , (when we touch something for example it is all electron interactions,) will exchange a virtual photon as in the diagram above.

Now the "change in path" is misleading . In detectors high energy electrons are identified by their energy loss in calorimeters. Low energy electrons are seen in bubble chambers:

electron

The curly line was produced by an electron that was struck by one of twelve passing beam particles in a liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. It curves in an applied magnetic field and loses energy rapidly, spiraling inwards.

A virtual photon is involved in the "strike" , and a multitude of virtual photons kick off the electron from hydrogen atoms, little energy is lost in each hit because the ionisation energy of hydrogen is ~13eV and the electron has some hundreds of keV, these create the small bubbles of the path.

"it is all photons , all the way down"

spoof from " it is all turtles , all the way down"

It is correct for the mathematical models used in particle physics studies. Because the electron interacts electromagnetically, and there are not only the real photons but also the virtual photons

virtual

which transfer the momentum and the quantum numbers in the interaction described by integrals over the variables. So conceptually there is always a photon intermediary in any everyday interaction of an electron. ( it also interacts with the weak and the gravitational but these are very weak effects, outside our measuring capabilities). An electron interacting with an electron , (when we touch something for example it is all electron interactions,) will exchange a virtual photon as in the diagram above.

It is correct for the mathematical models used in particle physics studies. Because the electron interacts electromagnetically, and there are not only the real photons but also the virtual photons

virtual

which transfer the momentum and the quantum numbers in the interaction described by integrals over the variables. So conceptually there is always a photon intermediary in any everyday interaction of an electron. ( it also interacts with the weak and the gravitational but these are very weak effects, outside our measuring capabilities). An electron interacting with an electron , (when we touch something for example it is all electron interactions,) will exchange a virtual photon as in the diagram above.

Now the "change in path" is misleading . In detectors high energy electrons are identified by their energy loss in calorimeters. Low energy electrons are seen in bubble chambers:

electron

The curly line was produced by an electron that was struck by one of twelve passing beam particles in a liquid hydrogen bubble chamber. It curves in an applied magnetic field and loses energy rapidly, spiraling inwards.

A virtual photon is involved in the "strike" , and a multitude of virtual photons kick off the electron from hydrogen atoms, little energy is lost in each hit because the ionisation energy of hydrogen is ~13eV and the electron has some hundreds of keV, these create the small bubbles of the path.

"it is all photons , all the way down"

spoof from " it is all turtles , all the way down"

1
source | link

It is correct for the mathematical models used in particle physics studies. Because the electron interacts electromagnetically, and there are not only the real photons but also the virtual photons

virtual

which transfer the momentum and the quantum numbers in the interaction described by integrals over the variables. So conceptually there is always a photon intermediary in any everyday interaction of an electron. ( it also interacts with the weak and the gravitational but these are very weak effects, outside our measuring capabilities). An electron interacting with an electron , (when we touch something for example it is all electron interactions,) will exchange a virtual photon as in the diagram above.