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    Post Closed as "off-topic" by Emilio Pisanty, stafusa, Jon Custer, ZeroTheHero, Yashas
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Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of general relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I am just concernedhave questions about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. 

When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light, instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

If space is being bent, then would not this effect occur at all angles of the sun? If it does, are their more photos of this in action? Has anyone tried correlating the displacement of stars light to the rotational direction of the sun, or large bodies of mass that light is passing nearby?

Rather than create a new topic and question, I have a theory about space myself that maybe some of you might be able to eat apart because I am not thinking things all the way through. Anyone care to enlighten me?

Gravity/Space Theory: Gravity is the attractive force of space wanting to come back together. Space is attracted to space. Like a magnets north pole is attracted to its south pole. When a particle occupies space, that is the result of space being ripped apart; As a ball would rip water apart as it got submerged. Space is a form of energy that has an attractive force on itself. Going through space with matter should require a small amount of energy to be used equal to the attractive force of space holding itself together in a given area. The attractive force of space wanting to come back together gets stronger as more mass is added to a given area of space. Space can be thought of as an attractive fluid type energy with very different properties than normal matter.

This could also be why every planet in the Solar System orbits in the same direction as our sun (definitely not the only logical theory to this). The suns large rotational force is enough to spin space energy around in a given orbital area. Since space has an attractive force on itself, when moving around a planet, it gives a small amount of push force from the breaking of the attractive force of space.

Einsteins general theory of Relativity does say:

One of the key tenets of general relativity is that space is not static. The motions of objects can change the structure of space. By contrast, in Newton's view of the universe, space is "inert."

Sorry if this question has already been asked. I am learning, and would like to learn more to better my understanding of the universe. Stack Exchange has very intelligent people that use it commonly enough, so I thought it would be the perfect place for a timely response from people that might actually understand things a whole lot better than me.

Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of general relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I am just concerned about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

If space is being bent, then would not this effect occur at all angles of the sun? If it does, are their more photos of this in action? Has anyone tried correlating the displacement of stars light to the rotational direction of the sun, or large bodies of mass that light is passing nearby?

Rather than create a new topic and question, I have a theory about space myself that maybe some of you might be able to eat apart because I am not thinking things all the way through. Anyone care to enlighten me?

Gravity/Space Theory: Gravity is the attractive force of space wanting to come back together. Space is attracted to space. Like a magnets north pole is attracted to its south pole. When a particle occupies space, that is the result of space being ripped apart; As a ball would rip water apart as it got submerged. Space is a form of energy that has an attractive force on itself. Going through space with matter should require a small amount of energy to be used equal to the attractive force of space holding itself together in a given area. The attractive force of space wanting to come back together gets stronger as more mass is added to a given area of space. Space can be thought of as an attractive fluid type energy with very different properties than normal matter.

This could also be why every planet in the Solar System orbits in the same direction as our sun (definitely not the only logical theory to this). The suns large rotational force is enough to spin space energy around in a given orbital area. Since space has an attractive force on itself, when moving around a planet, it gives a small amount of push force from the breaking of the attractive force of space.

Einsteins general theory of Relativity does say:

One of the key tenets of general relativity is that space is not static. The motions of objects can change the structure of space. By contrast, in Newton's view of the universe, space is "inert."

Sorry if this question has already been asked. I am learning, and would like to learn more to better my understanding of the universe. Stack Exchange has very intelligent people that use it commonly enough, so I thought it would be the perfect place for a timely response from people that might actually understand things a whole lot better than me.

Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of general relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I just have questions about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. 

When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light, instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

If space is being bent, then would not this effect occur at all angles of the sun? If it does, are their more photos of this in action? Has anyone tried correlating the displacement of stars light to the rotational direction of the sun, or large bodies of mass that light is passing nearby?

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Einstein's SpecialGeneral Theory of Relativity

Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of specialgeneral relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I am just concerned about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

Einstein's Special Theory of Relativity

Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of special relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I am just concerned about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

Einstein's General Theory of Relativity

Here is where my question comes in to play. Einsteins theory of general relativity was accepted because of this first experiment initially. I am just concerned about the method of calculation that proved this theory correct. When this experiment took place, what was the rotational direction of the sun in this photo? And if the rotational direction was the same direction as the displacement of the stars light, then could not the suns rotational direction have effected the light instead of the idea that space being bent around the suns mass caused this distortion in light?

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