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I am unconvinced by his (simplistic) use of Bernoulli's law to try to explain this effect; it is similar to the incorrect myth that airfoils generate lift due to Bernoulli's laweffect. Clearly, the water adheres to the ball due to viscous effects and surface tension, where Bernoulli cannot be used because it assumes that viscous forces are negligible.

Instead this is an application of the Magnus effect which explains how a spinning ball curves away from its principal flight path as observed e.g. in ballsports such as baseball. Due to the rotation of the ball, it drags air faster around one side, creating a difference in pressure that moves it in the direction of the lower-pressure side.

I am unconvinced by his (simplistic) use of Bernoulli's law to try to explain this effect; it is similar to the incorrect myth that airfoils generate lift due to Bernoulli's law. Clearly, the water adheres to the ball due to viscous effects and surface tension, where Bernoulli cannot be used because it assumes that viscous forces are negligible.

Instead this is an application of the Magnus effect which explains how a spinning ball curves away from its principal flight path as observed e.g. in ballsports such as baseball. Due to the rotation of the ball, it drags air faster around one side, creating a difference in pressure that moves it in the direction of the lower-pressure side.

I am unconvinced by his (simplistic) use of Bernoulli's law to try to explain this effect. Clearly, the water adheres to the ball due to viscous effects and surface tension, where Bernoulli cannot be used because it assumes that viscous forces are negligible.

Instead this is an application of the Magnus effect which explains how a spinning ball curves away from its principal flight path as observed e.g. in ballsports such as baseball. Due to the rotation of the ball, it drags air faster around one side, creating a difference in pressure that moves it in the direction of the lower-pressure side.

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source | link

I am unconvinced by his (simplistic) use of Bernoulli's law to try to explain this effect; it is similar to the incorrect myth that airfoils generate lift due to Bernoulli's law. Clearly, the water adheres to the ball due to viscous effects and surface tension, where Bernoulli cannot be used because it assumes that viscous forces are negligible.

Instead this is an application of the Magnus effect which explains how a spinning ball curves away from its principal flight path as observed e.g. in ballsports such as baseball. Due to the rotation of the ball, it drags air faster around one side, creating a difference in pressure that moves it in the direction of the lower-pressure side.