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So this Youtube video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjoVeritasium Hydrodynamic levitation! . Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

Edit4: New question, would this phenomenon occur if there was no air?

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

Edit4: New question, would this phenomenon occur if there was no air?

So this Youtube video has been around for a while now Veritasium Hydrodynamic levitation! . Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

Edit4: New question, would this phenomenon occur if there was no air?

5 new question
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So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

Edit4: New question, would this phenomenon occur if there was no air?

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

Edit4: New question, would this phenomenon occur if there was no air?

    Tweeted twitter.com/StackPhysics/status/933553797812670464
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source | link

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

So this video has been around for a while now https://youtu.be/mNHp8iyyIjo Also this Fluid Mechanics explanation of an object levitated next to an air jet may be related.

I just wanted to know if there is any standard hydrodynamic terms to explain it. Derek clearly states it is not about Bernoulli principle, as in this case the ball rotation is important.

Has any recent paper/videos discussed what happens if you do the same experiment with hydrophobic spheres? Can it be predicted with laminar flow theories or does it need turbulence?

Too many questions have been posed, but not so many responses on the internet yet.

Edit: I said Derek stated "it wasn't Coandă effect", yet what he says is that it is not "just Bernoulli's principle". Coandă effect is the typical hairdryer ping-pong ball levitation which is explained by Bernoulli's principle.

Edit2: rephrasing.

Additional comment: There seems to be two explanations "water adhere to the sphere and is ejected conserving horizontal momentum" and "Magnus effect" (ME). The later is not so obvious to me as the system is in equilibrium and there are two fluids, water and air, (does ME means air pushes the ball horizontally?).

Edit3: DESCRIPTION To avoid rot links and people that do not want to see the video, I'll try to explain the phenomena. You have a sphere and a water jet. The water jet is vertical (opposite to gravity), and touches the sphere almost tangentially. The ball not only rotates due to the water jet but also stays at constant height from the ground. The angular velocity can be defined in the direction of the cross product between the position of the contact point between the jet and the sphere (origin in the center of the sphere) and the direction of the jet. Some water drops fly away at the top of the sphere away from the jet.

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