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If the object was much much wider than the earth, you would accelerate toward the object at the same rate. This is the same idea as you and a pebble accelerating toward earth. If you have ever done this experiment, you know your accelerations are equal.

$$ F = -G M m/r^2 = m(-GM/r^2) = ma $$ $$ a = -GM/r^2 $$

Thus acceleration is independent of your mass or the earths mass. It only depends on the objects mass and distance to the surfaceseparation. The distance between you and the center of the earth would be the only thing that could cause a discrepancy between your accelerations. This effect could be major or minor depending on how wide the object is in relation to the earth. If it's much wider than the earth, the difference will be negligible. If it is comparable or smaller, the difference will be pronounced.

If the object was much much wider than the earth, you would accelerate toward the object at the same rate. This is the same idea as you and a pebble accelerating toward earth. If you have ever done this experiment, you know your accelerations are equal.

$$ F = -G M m/r^2 = m(-GM/r^2) = ma $$ $$ a = -GM/r^2 $$

Thus acceleration is independent of your mass or the earths mass. It only depends on the objects mass and distance to the surface. The distance between you and the center of the earth would be the only thing that could cause a discrepancy between your accelerations. This effect could be major or minor depending on how wide the object is in relation to the earth. If it's much wider than the earth, the difference will be negligible. If it is comparable or smaller, the difference will be pronounced.

If the object was much much wider than the earth, you would accelerate toward the object at the same rate. This is the same idea as you and a pebble accelerating toward earth. If you have ever done this experiment, you know your accelerations are equal.

$$ F = -G M m/r^2 = m(-GM/r^2) = ma $$ $$ a = -GM/r^2 $$

Thus acceleration is independent of your mass or the earths mass. It only depends on the objects mass and separation. The distance between you and the center of the earth would be the only thing that could cause a discrepancy between your accelerations. This effect could be major or minor depending on how wide the object is in relation to the earth. If it's much wider than the earth, the difference will be negligible. If it is comparable or smaller, the difference will be pronounced.

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source | link

If the object was much much wider than the earth, you would accelerate toward the object at the same rate. This is the same idea as you and a pebble accelerating toward earth. If you have ever done this experiment, you know your accelerations are equal.

$$ F = -G M m/r^2 = m(-GM/r^2) = ma $$ $$ a = -GM/r^2 $$

Thus acceleration is independent of your mass or the earths mass. It only depends on the objects mass and distance to the surface. The distance between you and the center of the earth would be the only thing that could cause a discrepancy between your accelerations. This effect could be major or minor depending on how wide the object is in relation to the earth. If it's much wider than the earth, the difference will be negligible. If it is comparable or smaller, the difference will be pronounced.